African American | KALW

African American

Lance Huntley

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts, guest host Leah Garchik talks about the African-American Shakespeare Company's unique annual holiday offering of Cinderellawith AASC founder and executive director Sherri Young and lead actress Funmi Lola (pictured). Cinderella, the often told tale of a scullery maid determined to take her life into her own hands and make it better, runs for 4 performances, December 20-22 at the Herbst Theater in San Francisco. 

AASC

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts, host David Latulippe talks with actors L. Peter Callender and Michael Ray Wisely (pictured), about the production of Shakespeare’s Othello by the African American Shakespeare Company (AASC), which runs from October 12-27 at the Marine’s Memorial Theatre (609 Sutter St.) in San Francisco, opening the company’s 25thseason.

StoryCorps

Music is a powerful way to connect people who come from different experiences, but there's a special kind of magic when music amplifies the diversity, heart, and history within one culture. Journalist Belva Davis and KKSF jazz show host Miranda Wilson tease out how the roots of Jazz and hymns are significant to African-American culture, starting with revisiting how Wilson started as an MC on a Bay Area jazz show.

This week on Open Air, KALW’s weekly radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts, we welcome as new guest host, the recently-retired and beloved San Francisco Chronicle columnist Leah Garchik (pictured, right, with David Latulippe). She will be talking to Adrian Roberts and Leontyne Mbele-Mbong (pic 2), who are the lead actors of the African American Shakespeare Company’s updated, modern-verse version of Macbeth

Philosophy Talk: Reparations

Jul 2, 2019
"Guyana" by CjimB used under CC license

Should any person or institution who has benefited from our sorry history of racism be required to compensate the victims of racism?


Kevin Berne

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the performing arts in the San Francisco Bay Area, Host David Latulippe talks with Tony Award winning  actor and San Francisco native BD Wong (above), who plays the lead in the A.C.T production of The Great Leap, by award-winning Bay Area playwright Lauren Yee. 

What does the political future of black women look like?

Feb 14, 2019
Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnnysilvercloud/">Johnny Silvercloud</a>

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll discuss the future of Black women in American politics.

Jessica Palopoli

This week, on 2018’s last edition of Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts, guest host Sarah Cahill talks with actors El Beh and Wiley Naman Strasser, who play the parts of Mary Poppins and Bert, respectively, in the San Francisco Playhouse production of the musical Mary Poppins, currently on stage through January 12, 2019. 

Gema Galina

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts, host David Latulippe talks with Charles Slender-White, founder and artistic director of FACT/SF, about the world premiere of death, an immersive dance performance about the loss of a loved one, which runs September 27 - October 13 at CounterPulse (80 Turk St.) in San Francisco.

99% Invisible: The Hair Chart

Aug 3, 2018

Oprah Winfrey’s hair is an amazing and ever-changing object of design. She’s worn dozens of styles over the years, including weaves and braids. She’s also a natural, meaning she doesn’t use chemical relaxers to straighten her hair.

Lance Huntley

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area performing arts, guest host Peter Robinson talks with actor L. Peter Callender and director Kirsten Brandt, about the production of Shakespeare’s historical play Richard III by the African-American Shakespeare Company (AASC), which opens this weekend and runs through July 29.

Photo by Andre Chung

On this edition of Your Call, Dr. Ibram X. Kendi discusses his book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. He argues that racism isn’t fading away as progress forges ahead – instead, racist ideas are evolving.

  

On this edition of Your Call, activist and scholar Dr. Janet Dewart Bell discusses her new book, Lighting the First of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement.

 

Leila Day

In some churches when the music starts, so does the praise dancing.

Dancers stand near the choir or the pulpit and perform choreographed routines that mix ballet, modern, and jazz. They are often young girls, who practice every movement and their focus is to praise.

Photo courtesy of the Nation Parks/modified from original

For the past decade 96-year-old Betty Reid Soskin has served as the nation’s oldest Park Ranger 

L. Peter Callender

This week on Open Air, KALW’s radio magazine for the Bay Area Performing Arts, host David Latulippe welcomes L. Peter Callender, artistic director of the African-American Shakespeare Company, and actress Jemier Jenkins, to discuss  the current AASC production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

Courtesy Firelight Media

  

On this edition of Your Call, filmmaker Stanley Nelson joins us to discuss Tell Them We Were Rising, a documentary that examines the impact Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBUCs) have had on American history, culture, and identity.

Did you know that Richmond, Milpitas, and Palo Alto all had sub-divisions where it was illegal for African Americans to own a house? On this edition of Your Call, Richard Rothstein discusses The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which details how laws and policy decisions promoted the very discriminatory patterns that continue today.

flickr user Dank Depot via creative commons

  

On this edition of Your Call: Now that marijuana is legal in California, who will benefit? And how will racially biased drug laws change?

A Patchwork Quilt Today Saturday 12/16/2017 at 5pm

Dec 16, 2017

Two celebrations at the same time, with music by such musicians as Nina Simone, The Klezmer Conservatory Band, Sister Rosetta Tharpe,  Andy Statman and David Grisman, and the like.  Enjoy!

Your Call: Can nonprofits survive the real estate crisis?

Jun 29, 2017
photo by flickr user Eric Richardson

  

In an increasingly tough real estate market, how can vital community based organizations survive?

 

Lance Huntley

This week, Peter Robinson is guest host for a discussion of Shakespeare with actor/director L. Peter Callender, artistic director of the African American Shakespeare Company, which concludes its season with "The Winter's Tale."  Also, actresses Susi Damilano and Julia Brothers talk about the premiere of "The Roommate" at SF Playhouse.  And author Tony Broadbent talks about his novel set during the heyday of The Beatles in Liverpool, Hamburg, and London:  "The One After 9:09:  A Mystery with a Backbeat"

SF Playhouse

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with choreographers Kristin Damrow, Lili Weckler and Alyssandra Wu about ‘Wild Bodies’, the 68th edition of ODC’s Pilot Program, in which six artists are challenged to choreograph new innovative works under the close mentorship of ODC’s staff and resident choreographer, Lizz Roman. ‘Pilot 68: Wild Bodies’ is presented at ODC Dance Commons on April 8 and 9.

Leila Day

Traver Riggins is playing with her toddler Charlie at home in Oakland. Riggins works as a server at a restaurant on the weekends; during the week she takes care of her daughter. She’s also a recently-trained doula.

This week on Open Air, host David Latulippe talks with Sherri Young, Executive Director  of the African-American Shakespeare Company about the production of ‘Cinderella’ by AASC, opening on December 22nd at The Herbst Theatre in San Francisco. Joining them is Samantha Rose Williams, who plays the lead role. 

Image courtesy of Creative Commons

Shelton Johnson brings the hidden history of Blacks in the American West to life through a storytelling project at Yosemite National Park. In his performance, he channels that past, and transforms into the fictional role of Buffalo Soldier Elizy Bowman. And, as a note for our listeners, this story contains some racially-charged language.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST / RESIZED AND CROPPED

Oakland singer and vocal activist Melanie DeMore believes in the power of song to bring people together. It’s what drives her work as performer, songwriter, and teacher.

 

Dawline-Jane Oni-Eseleh is an artist and illustrator. Her work ranges from photography to printmaking to pen-and-ink drawings she does while riding BART. 

Ladies in line

May 18, 2016
PERNILLA PERSSON. Cropped and resized

The Dr. George W. Davis Senior Center is the only building on the block where there is constant activity. Laughter pours out of the cafeteria, which for now has been turned into a dance floor. 

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