Africa | KALW

Africa

Impact Hub Khartoum

The Innovate for Africa Conference connects African entrepreneurs and innovators to Silicon Valley to create partnerships that can help the continent grow its already booming tech field. Cities like Lagos, Nigeria and Nairobi, Kenya have rapidly growing tech sectors. 

Courtesy of Theo Aytchan Williams

Theo Aytchan Williams was walking through Oakland when he heard African drumming. The beat stayed in his and hasn’t left. Now he’s sharing his love for music and dance as founder of Samba Funk.

Jazz meets spirituality at the St. John Coltrane Church

Jul 25, 2019
Freimut Bahlo / Wikimedia Commons

In this week's Audiograph we head to San Francisco's Fillmore district, once known as the 'Harlem of the West,' jammed with clubs overflowing with song. While the district has changed over the decades, reverance for one musician in particular has not — a tenor saxophonist who has been canonized and praised for half-a-century. The St. John Coltrane Church celebrated it's 50th anniversary this month. 

  On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, filmmaker Phyllis Stuart will join us to discuss her new documentary Wild DaZe.

The Stoop: African writers' dilemma

Aug 2, 2018
Courtesy of The Stoop

Who gets to choose which African stories get told? In this special episode from The Stoop, we meet three writers, each of them pushing against a mostly white US and UK-based publishing industry in their own way. 

Claire Stremple

 

“Oh, my god!”

 

Erica Deeman gasps as she walks into her solo exhibition for the first time.

 

“Sometimes I have to pinch myself. It is the first time I’ve seen them all in a room together, all thirty pieces framed.”

"Day 13: My morning at DMV" by Flickr user Vicky Sedgwick. Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 / cropped and resized

When it comes to undocumented immigrants applying for an AB 60 driver's license, it has been especially hard for people whose country is not on the list of countries whose nationals are approved to apply for AB 60, whose passports contain an electronic chip.

"Fullerton DMV" by Flickr user Micah Sittig. Used under CC BY 2.0 / cropped and resized.

 

AB 60 — a year-old law allowing undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses — hasn’t worked the same for everyone. For some people, like Ghanaian national Eko Croffie, a small complication can mean a long journey ahead.

 

On New Year's Eve, join KALW's Africa Mix for a great night of African music, from 9pm until midnight.

Dancing with Mama Diouf

Nov 25, 2015
diamanocoura.org

Oakland-based Diamano Coura West African Dance Company celebrates its 40th anniversary this year.

Dancing in and escaping from wartime Liberia

Nov 25, 2015
DIAMANOCOURA.ORG

Karsumo Massaquoi is one of Diamano Coura’s former dancers. He’s a man who loves, and lives, to dance. But, he almost did not survive to do either.

Afropop Worldwide's "San Francisco: Afropop By the Bay" tells the unlikely story of how a group of superb African musicians-from Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa-landed in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1970s and early '80s.

On the April 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Hajooj Kuka about his award winning documentary Beats of the Antonov. It tells the story of refugee communities Sudan and how music and dance has been vital to keep their cultural heritage alive. The film is playing at the San Francisco International Film Festival. How does music unify people? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Hana Baba and you.

Guests:

Hajooj Kuka, former war reporter and the director of Beats of the Antonov

Tom Levy

  Some people who take dance classes regularly have a saying: “Dance is my church.”

Dancer Stella Adelman says just that about going to Afro-Cuban folkloric dance class. “There’s a release to it,” she says. To her, it’s a place where she can reflect and find some clarity through movement. To some practitioners this clarity comes from being active and getting exercise, for others, it’s literally a spiritual practice.  

The Bay Area is home to many instructors of Afro-Cuban rhythms. Music and dance lovers come from all over the world to participate in workshops taught by some of the most loved teachers and dancers from the Cuban Diaspora. Many of them have found home here.

Liner Notes: Bells Atlas

Jan 7, 2015

    

Try not to describe the Oakland quartet Bells Atlas using worn-out genre labels, just think of the feeling you get when you hear their voices and rhythms blend. The records they brought in give a glimpse as to what emerges in the studio: from African highlife and Nina Simone to 90s hip-hop and alt rock.

Catch Bells Atlas every Monday night in January at the Era Art Bar and Lounge in Oakland as part of their Oakland Music Festival residency.

Hana Baba

Racial and religious stereotyping are sadly a reality we still have to live with in the United States. You hear that discussed nowadays in light of police shootings of young African American men, or in African immigrant communities around the country that are dealing with another form of discrimination: harassment based on Ebola stigma. Over the weekend, Bay Area African leaders and activists gathered in Oakland to discuss what should be done about it. 

 

On the December 3rd, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about growing foreign investment in the African continent.  At a recent U.S.-Africa leaders summit in Washington, American private investors pledged $14 billion for construction, clean energy, banking and information technology. China has been the single largest source of annual foreign direct investment in the continent for the past several years. What do outsiders want from Africa? And what does this mean for the future of the continent? It's Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

LGBT Africans Speak Out On Growing Homophobia

Nov 13, 2014

  

With Uganda's ruling party this week proposing a new anti-gay bill many LGBT advocates say is even worse than the law struck down in August, a Ugandan civil rights leader and two activists from Cameroon appear on Out in the Bay (Thursday, 7pm) to give first-hand accounts of the situation in their countries.Pepe Onziema, program director of Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG), talks about government tracking of activists and the public backlash after Uganda's high court nullified the country's Anti-Homosexuality Act, and describes how homophobia and transphobia are sweeping across Africa. Gaelle runs the Cameroon non-profit women's support organization Elles; Cedric, who worked for an AIDS organization, fled Cameroon last year fearing for his life and now lives in the Bay Area. (Gaelle and Cedric did not want their last names used.) We also hear "We Were the Hunted Then" from St. Louis, Missouri-based singer/songwriter Jon Valley.

www.ethiopianopinion.com


Last June, the U.S. Congress made a landmark decision to pass immigration reform. The new law eliminates the Diversity Immigrant Lottery Visa, also known as the Green Card Lottery. 

Stanford Storytelling Project: "How Not to Give" The story of an entrepreneur who wanted to give one million t-shirts to Africa.

Youth Radio podcast: “A Critical Look at MOOCs -- Massive On-Line Courses”

  

God Loves Uganda is a new feature-length documentary about the influence of U.S.-based evangelical Christian missionaries who have been whipping up anti-gay religious fervor in Uganda for many years.  Uganda’s parliament is still considering a proposed Anti-Homosexuality Bill that, even though the death penalty has been removed from it, would still be one of the most punitive anti-gay measures in the world. The link that God Loves Uganda shows between religious extremists in this country and the virulent homophobia in Uganda is chilling and creepy.  Filmmaker Roger Ross Williams visited KALW studios to play film clips and talk about his journeys to Africa and Missouri to make this documentary with Out in the Bay's Eric Jansen. (Broadcast Oct. 31, 2013)

Jen Chien

 

The pulse of drums spills out onto the street from an upper window of the Malonga Casquelord Center for the Arts, a big Art Deco building in the Lakeside district of Oakland. Up on the third floor, a battery of eight drummers is lined up against one wall of a large dance studio, vibrating the air with their music.

Homo-Fear in Africa

Jan 3, 2013

Homo-fear in Africa:   Host Marilyn Pittman gets a detailed debrief from journalist Edwin Okong'o about the fragile state of LGBT civil rights in Uganda and other African countries.


Photo by Christopher Connelly

In the last twenty years, the Eastern African islands Zanzibar have become a top destination for tourists. They come for the beautiful beaches, the food, the history and the architecture.  But in the last two decades another economy has developed:  the drug trade.