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Bikinis for Trans Girls; Gay Mystery Novel is Award Finalist

Ruby Alexander of RUBIES
Courtesy of RUBIES
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Ruby Alexander enjoys the RUBIES swimwear her dad created.

“Every Girl Deserves To Shine” is a campaign to support transgender girls and is the principle that guides RUBIES, a form-fitting clothing line for trans girls and gender non-binary kids founded by a Canadian father-daughter duo in Toronto.

When Ruby Alexander was 11 years old, she decided she wanted to wear a bikini, just like her friends. No more baggy board shorts! After an extensive search, her father, tech entrepreneur Jamie Alexander, realized there really weren’t any suitable bikini bottoms for his daughter, nor for other transgender and gender non-binary youngsters.

So he set out to make them and founded RUBIES in 2019. Since then, RUBIES has sold over 1,000 black and pink shaping bikini bottoms in more than 20 countries worldwide.

Ruby and Jamie tell Out in the Bay producer Kendra Klang what makes their swimwear special, about their campaign to send free swimwear to trans girls who might not be able to afford them and other ways they help trans girls shine.

In Out in the Bay's second half this week, author David Perry reads from and talks about his murder-mystery novel Upon This Rock, a tangled tale of homophobia, corruption and sex scandals at the highest levels of the Roman Catholic Church that takes place over five centuries in Italy and Vatican City. The book is a finalist for the Ben Franklin Award: Best Gay Novel of 2020.

Eric Jansen is a long-time broadcaster and print journalist. A former news anchor, producer and reporter at KQED FM, San Francisco; KLIV AM, San Jose; and Minnesota Public Radio, Eric's award-winning reports have been heard on many NPR programs and PRI's Marketplace. His print work has been in The Mercury News, The Business Journal, and LGBTQ magazines Genre and The Advocate, among other publications. He co-produced the June 2007 PBS documentary Why We Sing!, about LGBTQ choruses and their role in the civil rights fight.