© 2021 KALW
KALW Public Media / 91.7 FM Bay Area
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
KALW_CC_2021_art.png
Crosscurrents

Daily news roundup for Thursday, October 1, 2015

10-01-15_News-Digest.jpg
Ryan Grimm
/
Arrow Stage From the Trees

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW News:

Public Grounds: How do Golden Gate Park’s music festivals affect those who call it home? // SF Weekly

“When an estimated 750,000 people flood Golden Gate Park for Hardly Strictly Bluegrass this weekend, they'll share the space with the park's residents.

“Over 252 people live in Golden Gate Park, according to the city's most-recent homeless count. On most nights, around 100 "fly-by-nighters" — a term that the chronically homeless use for short-term campers — can be found in the park.

“"We're completely free and open to the public," wrote Chris Oldaker, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass's communications officer. "We don't fence off the park or restrict access, so there's no need to bother or displace anyone. Everyone is welcome, so it's not like we're kicking people out."”

-----

Coal-shipping plan divides Oakland over health, jobs issues // San Francisco Chronicle

“Oakland’s City Council has until early December to make a costly choice: agree to move millions of tons of potentially lung-damaging coal through the city each year for export, or ban the coal and disrupt — potentially derailing — a major development that promises nearly 12,000 jobs.

“Opposition to coal is mounting from public health experts, environmental groups and even some council members. But the company contracted to develop and operate a shipping terminal set to open near the east end of the Bay Bridge in 2018 is threatening to pull out if coal transportation is blocked in Oakland — and that could delay or hinder the $880 million, 366-acre development project.”

------

City College Acts to Help Students Transfer // Mission Local

“A program aimed at helping San Francisco City College students to transfer more easily to four year universities was officially launched Tuesday at the city college’s Mission campus.

“According to institutional research by the school, 55 percent of City College students drop out within the first two years of enrollment.

“The transfer program helps students complete their associate degrees in a timely manner by co-enrolling students in themed general education courses with a “cohort” of their peers over four semesters. The theme, which at the Mission campus is “diversity and social justice,” adds focus to otherwise boring and disjointed general math and English courses.”