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Morning Edition from NPR

Weekdays 5-9am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne

NPR's signature morning show, with news updates from the BBC at the top of each hour.  Also, a local daily almanac at 5:49 and 8:49, what's for lunch in the San Francisco public schools at 6:49 (during the school year), and daily commentary from Jim Hightower at 7:49.   Enjoy the Crosscurrents Morning Report from KALW News Monday through Thursday at 6:51 & 8:51.

On Key Largo, to walk to Paul Butler's house it's best to wear rubber boots. "Did you see the 'No Wake' sign?" he asks. The recently installed "No Wake" signs are for drivers, not boaters.

There are several inches of water on his street and others in this low-lying neighborhood. Butler has lived here 25 years and seen this kind of flooding before.

"It used to happen once a year during king tide, but it would only last for like a week or 10 days," he says. "This year, it's been going on for about 75 days, I think." Other neighbors put it at 80 days and counting.

There's a new question that anti-hunger advocates want doctors and nurses to ask patients: Do you have enough food?

Public health officials say the answer often is "not really." So clinics and hospitals have begun stocking their own food pantries in recent years.

One of the latest additions is Connectus Health, a federally funded clinic in Nashville, Tenn. This month, the rear of LaShika Taylor's office transformed into a community cupboard.

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What was President Trump's personal lawyer really seeking from Ukraine?

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Walters Sports Bar is a gleaming new pub just blocks from the largest stadium in Washington, D.C. The decor is industrial chic — exposed ducts and poured concrete floors — and it's spacious enough to accommodate the enormous throngs of elated fans who crowded in after the Washington Nationals' recent World Series win.

On a recent night, the bar was quieter. Still, customer after customer strode up to a stainless steel wall lined with beer taps to insert a card, touch a screen and pour a glass of self-serve beer.

No waitstaff. No waiting.

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Sarah Mackin runs a cotton swab around the inside of a tiny plastic baggie that appears to be empty. She spreads whatever residue the swab picked up onto a test strip that resembles a Band-Aid, then slides the strip into a buzzing machine about the size of a boxed, take-home pie. Then she waits, hoping for information that she can share with Boston's community of opioid users.

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The order came from the president of the United States - do not distribute the nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine. But he didn't give a reason, at least not to staff at the Office of Management and Budget.

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What follows is a quote from a federal court ruling - "The primary takeaway from the past 250 years of recorded American history is that presidents are not kings."

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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The intruder who broke into Willie Murphy's house had another thing coming. She's 82 but also an award-winning weightlifter.

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The latest country shaken by anti-government demonstrations is Colombia. Days of protests have been serious enough that President Ivan Duque says he will meet the protesters today. Reporter John Otis has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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News Brief: McGahn Ruling, Impeachment Probe, Colombia Protests

Nov 26, 2019

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Faced with congressional subpoenas, the White House cannot just say no.

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In his new book Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump, Neal Katyal, former acting solicitor general of the United States during the Obama administration, writes what he casts as the definitive legal argument about the impeachment inquiry.

Katyal, who is a lawyer and law professor at Georgetown University, argues that the circumstances that led to the impeachment inquiry of Trump are those that essentially led the Founding Fathers to include an impeachment clause in the Constitution.

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So we like to think of ourselves as a highly mobile society, but these days Americans are staying put more than ever before. And this has consequences for families, communities and the economy, as NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Ever since they were kids growing up on Staten Island, N.Y., David Carles and his younger brother Mark Carles have been inseparable.

But in October last year, they were dealt a huge blow: Mark, now 25, was diagnosed with a rare form of liver cancer called fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma.

The brothers, just a year apart in age, still don't know how much time they'll have together; they only know that they want to spend as much of it as they can side by side.

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