Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Got a general comment, story, or tip for us? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

San Francisco Unified’s graduation rate for African American students jumps to nearly 90 percent — well above the state average.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the United Nations reported that an unprecedented number of people have been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

Teresa Cotsirilos / KALW

In 2019, the UN’s Refugee Agency reported that an unprecedented number of people had been forced to flee their home countries. Over 70 million people are currently displaced worldwide, and the global refugee population is expected to increase in 2020.

David Boyer / KALW

Hear the entire episode on the podcast >>

Burning Man is pagan at its core with a hellish, flaming aesthetic. It's understandable that many evangelical leaders condemn the event. But why do many devout Christians attend?And what do they do once they're there? THE INTERSECTION finds out. 

Courtesy of Freddie Hughes

When you walk into the dimly lit Royal Cuckoo Organ Lounge on Mission Street, you might hear the familiar voice of a man serenading the dive bar’s mostly millennial crowd. It’s soul singer Freddie Hughes, a veteran of the Bay Area music scene for more than six decades and the vocalist on several hit records from the 1960s. In this edition of Bay Area Beats, Freddie shares his story. 

Denisha DeLane / Faithinthebay.com

At Allen Temple Baptist Church in Oakland, it’s not the future that’s female, it’s the present. Reverend Dr. Jacqueline Thompson is the first female senior pastor in the church’s 100-year history. She talks about her vision for leadership and gender issues in the black church.

Amy Osborne

For 80 years, Batman has captivated the imagination of kids and adults. The mysterious vigilante who fights deadly villains with cool gadgets has evolved into a multibillion-dollar franchise.

Sarah Lai Stirland

‘Tis the season when we see houses bedecked in lights and hear hecka holiday songs wherever we go. One place where the sights and sounds of the season are concentrated is what’s known as Christmas Tree Lane.

Angela Johnston

 

For many people in the Bay Area, the holidays aren’t complete without a big meal of fresh Dungeness crab. The commercial season was supposed to begin on November 15th, just in time for Thanksgiving. But this year, fishermen had to wait a month to set their traps.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

  

The H-1B is one of the most commonly-used work visas in the United States, and the Trump Administration is denying them at a record rate. Data reporter Sinduja Rangarajan spent eight months investigating why.

Episode 5: Prison’s Secret Santas

Dec 16, 2019

For those of us in prison, the holiday season can be a painful time. Many of us miss our families and our traditions. But it’s also a time when we get together with food and acts of kindness.

This is the last episode of our first season of Uncuffed. For the finale, we’re coming together for the holidays. You’ll hear from the guys at both Solano and San Quentin, and find out how we all get through this time of the year.

U.S. Department of Education

Federal law guarantees public school students experiencing homelessness a host of rights, to bring them educational stability. But a recent state audit found poor compliance and oversight across California.

Holly McDede

In this Audiograph, we head to the Bayview district, where 50 goats are hanging out at the City Grazing offices.

Markus Mollenberg

When Kelsey Custard was a kid in Sacramento, she didn’t go to the circus or see clowns. Now she’s clowning for Cirque du Soleil and making people laugh all over the world. Her latest show is Amaluna.

Jerome Paulos / BHS Jacket

From Greta Thunberg to Youth vs. Apocalypse, young people around the world are fighting climate change. But in Berkeley, where students have been pushing environmental goals for decades, logistical realities are making sustainable solutions difficult.

Kitka Brings The Music Of Eastern Europe To The Bay

Dec 11, 2019
Thomas Pacha

Kitka is a women's singing ensemble based in Oakland. For more than 35 years, the group has been singing songs drawn from Eastern European vocal traditions. What began as an informal group of singers with a passion for those Eastern European harmonies and rhythms has grown into a critically-acclaimed professional ensemble.

Courtesy of Carly Bond

Carly Bond is a songwriter and guitar player. Her band, Meernaa, released their first full-length record this summer titled Heart Hunger. She began writing songs for it after she discovered a family secret. Through processing her family’s history, she’s crafted a synth-driven, dreamy landscape.

Jenee Darden / KALW

Oakland city officials estimate that more than 4,000 people are homeless. Activists are demanding the city do more immediately. A group called Moms 4 Housing are taking a stand by occupying a vacant home in West Oakland.

Morgan Lieberman

Hear the entire series on the podcast >>

Burning Man is guided by the so-called "10 Princples," one of which is radical inclusion. What does that mean for people with disabilities? Especially at an event that spans seven-square miles of cracked desert, and the most common form of transit is biking.

Daniel Parks, Flickr Creative Commons CC BY-NC 2.0

Last month, more than 100 people crowded into a library for a public meeting in Pinole, a tiny city North East of Richmond. They were there to fight a proposal to dredge the shipping canal in the Bay.

The Lavin Agency

Sometimes it may feel like our society lacks empathy for other points of view, especially in politics, but also when we talk about race, gender, or even sports — we can discount the feelings and experiences of people who are different. 

Free At Last, Thanks To A New California Law

Dec 9, 2019
Steve Drown / Uncuffed

From the project Uncuffed:

The Reed brothers, Jesse and Greg, came to prison as crime partners. Jesse was the shooter and his little brother Greg was just there to rob. They both got life sentences, with the opportunity to parole.

Ariella Markowitz / KALW

If you live in West Oakland, you’re more likely to visit the emergency room for a respiratory illness than anywhere else in the Bay Area. The culprit is diesel pollution, and heavy-duty trucks are a big part of the problem. Now, truckers like Bill Aboudi are going to be part of the solution.

Alfonso Jimenez / Flikr Creative Commons

Every 15 hours, someone is taken to the San Francisco General Hospital after being hit by a car. That’s according to San Francisco Chronicle Reporter Heather Knight.

Julie Caine

If you live or work in San Francisco, you probably hear this week’s Audiograph sound every Tuesday at noon. 

Magnolia McKay / KALW

Jules Indelicato is a Bay Area musician. They recently took part in the durational performance art project "Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy." For eight hours a day, three days in a row, 30 women and non-binary musicians played popular love songs on repeat.

Eric Gay / AP Photo

The Trump Administration is expanding its Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a policy that says asylum seekers at the US-Mexican border must remain in Mexico while they wait for their hearings.

Andria Lo

Mimi Lok is the executive director of the human-rights organization Voice of Witness, whose mission is to amplify unheard voices. Mimi carries the passion over her day job over to the world she imagines.

Need To Vent? Call California's Warm Line

Dec 3, 2019
Audrey Dilling

This piece first aired in May, 2015. Since then, Daisy Matthias has moved on from the warm line and Dilhara Abeygoonesekera has replaced Melodee Jarvis as program manager. 

Seventy thousand people call San Francisco’s suicide crisis line each year. If someone's making that call, it usually means they're on the verge of harming themselves, and in severe emotional distress. But San Francisco has a service that’s aimed at reaching people before they’re on the brink of crisis — the San Francisco Mental Health Association's Peer-Run Warm Line.

Lee Romney / KALW

This is part of an ongoing series “Learning While Black: The Fight For Equity In San Francisco Schools.”

It’s been 40 years since a landmark legal ruling led to a statewide ban on the IQ testing of black students for purposes of placement in special ed. Now, the lead plaintiff in that case, known as “Larry P,” is getting a second chance at an education.

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