Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org.

Yunfei Ren

San Francisco lost one of its most influential queer elders this year. Phyllis Lyon was a lesbian activist and trailblazer. She died in April at the age of 95. Phyllis developed dementia in her final years and was able to live independently in her own home. Or so she thought. A community of lesbian, queer, and trans people supported her with kindness... and deceit.

Meiying Wu

In the third month of shelter in place, some people are anxious to go outside and see friends. Others have to think about where they’ll park their home each night and how to get clean water for showers. Constance Johnson and her kids have been riding out the pandemic on a converted school bus in Richmond.

Courtesy of Seth Eisen

Seth Eisen’s OUT of Site, is a theater project where audiences follow actors around the streets of San Francisco and watch them perform at locations in LGBTQ+ history. Audiences will have fun on their next history lesson virtually in OUT of Site: SOMA

Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group

 

This week the Bay Area entered its fourth month of shelter-in-place. And it's a confusing time: infection rates are climbing in some counties, just as local resturants are welcoming back diners.

Lee Romney

This is the second part of a two-part series on dyslexia. Listen to Part One here.

Our stories are made to be heard. Please listen if you are able.

Geraldine Robinson stepped proudly onto the stage and stated her name. What she said next was an understatement: “I am a fightin’ grandmother.” 

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. This one features San Francisco author Anne Raeff reading from her new book, "Only the River."

Manolo Morales / KALW

Hey Area is where we find answers to questions you ask. One listener wanted to know, what is the back story of Jose Castro, the individual that the Castro District is named after?

Lee Romney

This is the first part of a two-part series on dyslexia. Listen to Part Two here.

Over the past few decades, big scientific advances have helped us identify and understand dyslexia. But overall, public schools around the country are still failing students with the learning disorder -- particularly low-income kids of color.

This Hey Area question comes from three members of the East Oakland Collective, a group working for positive change in deep East Oakland. They wanted to know: What is the impact of the history of the Black Panthers in East Oakland?

Steve Drown

From the series Uncuffed:

John Taylor

 

John Taylor, also known as One Shot Johnny, is a mobile butcher. He’s always considered himself essential. But as some of the largest COVID-19 outbreaks have forced some large slaughterhouses to temporarily close, John has never been busier. In this installment of "The Essentials," John gives KALW's Victor Tence an intro to mobile butchery. 
 

Click the play button above to listen to this story.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Nearly three months into shelter-in-place, society is beginning to reopen. People are heading outside. For some it’s to restaurants or back to work. Many are joining the anti-racism protests that began over two weeks ago. And change is happening - in communities, and in government.

Photo courtesy of Rue Mapp

An incident involving a white woman calling the cops on a black birder in Central Park last month sparked a conversation about racism in the outdoors world. And, it sparked a celebration online: Black Birders Week. Black naturalists highlighted both the prejudices and the joys they experience out in nature. One of their messages? There are more of us than you think. 

Chasing Donguri CC-by-NC-SA 2.0

COVID has cancelled many people’s vacation plans, so more Bay Areans might be turning to camping. But can we go? Is it safe? And how can we do it responsibly?

Public Domain

Bonnie Pointer, one of the founding members of Oakland's legendary Pointer Sisters, died yesterday, at 69 years old. After years singing choir music in their home town, Bonnie and her sister June started performing in San Francisco in 1969. When their sister Anita joined them soon after, they made music history.

Adreanna Rodriguez / KALW

In California, farms have not been immune to COVID-19. A Farm Bureau Federation survey recently found that more than half of farms across the state have lost customers or sales due to pandemic. Small family farms are especially vulnerable.

Sarchasm is a Berkeley-based band that’s been together for a decade. They’ve used their music to work through challenges, spread political messages, and support each other.

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. Today, we're featuring San Anselmo-based author Kate Milliken reading from her  new novel, "Kept Animals."

Courtesy of Roots Community Health Center

EDITOR'S NOTE: A previous version of this interview contained errors that have been corrected, below:

* When Dr. Noha Aboelata said the virus is "almost controlled within the white population" we didn't mention she was referring to HIV/AIDS, not COVID-19. We apologize for any confusion our error may have caused.

-----

The weather is warmer and many people are out protesting. But the coronavirus is still here and East Oakland remains a hot spot for COVID-19. Dr. Noha Aboelata of Roots Community Health Center is concerned that people are relaxing too fast.

From the producers of Uncuffed and San Quentin Radio:

Close to 3,500 inmates are currently incarcerated at San Quentin. They live in cells that are 48 square feet, and a little less than eight feet tall — most of them with a cellmate. From San Quentin Radio, here’s the story of a pair of cellmates who made the choice to live together, despite a mountain of obstacles.

Madolan Greene / Flickr Creative Commons / cropped

Reuben Houston is the owner and director of one of Colma Cremation and Funeral Services. The Bay Area has seen a relatively low COVID death rate compared to other population centers, but the virus has still affected his work. In this installment of "The Essentials," Reuben says the pandemic may change the way funerals are conducted for good.

For the past 11 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times.  This week, many have started leaving their homes to protest another pandemic. 

While we're sheltered in place, we’re bringing Bay Area author readings to you as part of our "New Arrivals" series. Today, we're featuring Oakland author Melanie Abrams reading from her new book, "Meadowlark."

Courtesy of Alameda County Public Defender

The Bay Area protests against ongoing police brutality have caused cities and counties to enact curfews, including Alameda County.

Courtesy of Geoff Livingston

While many organizers have told protesters to socially distance and wear masks, public health experts fear the Bay Area’s demonstrations could still fuel a rise in COVID-19 infections. That could be particularly devastating to the same black and brown communities most impacted by police brutality.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons


Tony Thurmond is California’s first black Superintendent of Public Schools in four decades. Since mid-March, he’s spoken publicly only about the coronavirus. On Monday, that changed with an emotional address about racism and implicit bias.

Meradith Hoddinott

Artists, drag queens, and members of the queer and trans community gathered together to mourn the closing of San Francisco’s oldest LGBT bar, The Stud. 

Ep. 10 - I Have A Bucket

May 29, 2020

For the past 10 weeks, we’ve been checking in regularly with a mix of people to hear how they’re dealing with these extraordinary times. In this episode, we hear from a family questioning their memorial day trip down the coast, a potter who gets a positive test, and a mother afraid to send her kid back to school. It's Day By Day: KALW's Quarantine Diaries.

Cast A Line At The Angling Club

May 27, 2020

We’re down in the wilder spaces of the park, now. The lower side, with its hiking and mountain bike trails, its hidden gardens, its untamed forests. We continue westward, exploring this less cultivated area where there's more space and more animals, too. You’ll see coyotes out here sometimes. Plenty of raccoons in the evening. Foxes, if you’re lucky. We turn off the road, back into the forest. It’s quiet except for the occasional whizzing sound, gentle crank, and quiet chatter. We’re at Golden Gate Park’s casting pools. Reporter Ian Lewis shows us how it's done. 

Julia Llinas Goodman / KALW

Since shelter in place began, health officials around the Bay Area have struggled to deal with packed parks and beaches. And then there are the crowds at Lake Merritt.

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