99% Invisible | KALW

99% Invisible

99% Invisible is a tiny radio show about design, architecture & the 99% invisible activity that shapes our world. Roman Mars is also the host, producer and program director of Public Radio Remix from PRX. 

On this week's edition of 99% Invisible:

IKEA hacking is the practice of buying things from IKEA and reengineering -- or "hacking" -- them to become customized, more functional, and often just better-designed stuff. 

Friday at 7:35am and 4:45 pm, and Saturday at 8:35am.

Cities, like living things, evolve slowly over time. Buildings and structures get added and renovated and removed, and in this process, bits and pieces that get left behind.

99% Invisible.  Friday at 7:35am and 4:45pm, Saturday at 8:35am.

What happens when we build big?  For people who distrust the big project, Edward Tenner’s 2001 essay   "The Xanadu Effect"is some comfort. Tenner, a visiting scholar at Princeton University, ponders the ways in which obsession with bigness can presage hard times for a business or even a nation.

99% Invisible.  Friday at 7:30 am & 4:45pm.  Saturday at 8:35am.

As humans have developed cities and built environments, we have also needed to develop ways to find our way through them.  Today, signage and other cues to help you find your way come from the field of environmental graphic design, or “wayfinding.”  Chances are that any signs in an airport, in a hospital, or on a freeway, were created by professional wayfinders.

99% Invisible.  Friday at 7:35am & 4:45pm.  Saturday at 8:35am.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Lawyers have an ethics code. Journalists have an ethics code. Architects do, too.

According to Ethical Standard 1.4 of the American Institute of Architects (AIA):  "Members should uphold human rights in all their professional endeavors." 

  

99% Invisible: "Duplitecture"The best knock-offs in the world are in China. There are plenty of fake designer handbags and Rolexes but China’s knock-offs go way beyond fashion. There are knock-off Apple stores that look so much like the real thing, some employees believe they are working in real Apple stores.  And then there are entire knock-off cities.

Friday at 7:35am and 4:45pm, Saturday at 8:35am.

Radio Ambulante Unscripted: "Riding The Beast" Host Daniel Alarcón talks to investigative journalist Oscar Martinez about his experience riding the "The Beast," the infamous train that takes migrants through Mexico on their way to the United States.

Before the 1850s, dentures were made out of very hard, very painful and very expensive material, like gold or ivory. They were a luxury item. The invention of Vulcanite hard rubber changed everything. Everyone began making dentures with Vulcanite bases. But in 1864, a long disputed patent application was acquired by the Goodyear Dental Vulcanite Company, an outfit created to collect fees, or very often, sue dentists who already used vulcanite.  And there were plenty of dentists to go after. 

99% Invisible: "Duplitecture"  The best knock-offs in the world are in China. There are plenty of fake designer handbags and Rolexes but China’s knock-offs go way beyond fashion. There are knock-off Apple stores that look so much like the real thing, some employees believe they are working in real Apple stores.  And then there are entire knock-off cities.

99% Invisible: Ten Thousand Years  In 1990, the federal government invited a group of  geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nation’s only permanent underground repository for nuclear waste.

Tune in for three hours of head-turning, mind-opening stories from Radiotopia, curated and co-hosted by 99% Invisible's Sam Greenspan and Crosscurrents' Ashleyanne Krigbaum.  Tuesday, May 6th from 9pm to Midnight.

99% Invisible: “Structural Integrity”  When it was built in 1977, Citicorp Center was the seventh-tallest building in the world.  But it’s the base of the building that really makes the tower so unique. The bottom nine of its 59 stories are stilts. 

Blank on Blank: "Johnny Cash on the Gospel" "I just hope and pray I can die with my boots on." A previously unheard interview recorded in 1996.

Harvard College Observatory Collection of Astronomical Photographs

99% Invisible "Title TK" The name is important. It’s the first thing of any product you use or buy or see. The tip of the spear.  Only the names that are most interesting and most pleasant on the tongue can survive in your memory. So it’s no surprise that companies—especially large ones like Sony or Procter & Gamble—hire naming companies.

The Memory Palace: "400,000 Stars"

99% Invisible: “Call Now” The subtle, possibly endless civil war over how attorneys should advertise their services (and whether they should advertise at all).

VoiceBox: "Auctioneering"  Inside the rhythm, art and sport of the live auction, with Colorado Auctioneers Hall of Famer Steve Linnebur and Tennessee auctioneer Justin Ochs.

Glen Weldon, author of Superman: The Unauthorized Biography (and panelist of the great Pop Culture Happy Hour) talks us through the iconography of our first superhero and why Supes has managed to stay relevant for 75 years.

On this week's 99% Invisible: Late in 1928 Walter Chrysler, founder of the Chrysler car company, came to New York and bought a plot of land and decided to build, what he referred to as, “a monument to me.”  What followed was an epic back and forth struggle for the glory of ruling the New York City skyline.

Listen here.

99% Invisible "New Old Town" The rebuilding of post-war Warsaw.

The Memory Palace "Shadowboxing" The stories that were told about legendary boxer John L. Sullivan, and the stories he told about himself.

Radio producer Sam Greenspan, who works with Roman Mars on "99% Invisible" will share a special mix of extended "99%" episodes never before heard on KALW, plus some of his favorite podcasts.  Tuesday at 11pm.

Flickr user gorbould

Last night, the Golden State Warriors beat the Denver Nuggets 131 to 117 in what USA Today called “one of the most entertaining blowouts in recent memory.” The high-scoring affair reflects the modern game. But scores that high would have been unfathomable back in the early days of the NBA. That is, until professional basketball was redesigned.

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Though its official name is JFK Plaza, the open space near Philadelphia’s City Hall is more commonly known as LOVE Park, after the Robert Indiana sculpture installed there.  Designed by Edmund Bacon and Vincent Kling, the park was fashioned in high modernism:  sleek, granite benches; geometric raised planter beds, and long expanses of pavement.  Its success as a pedestrian plaza is debatable.  

But it turned out to be perfect for skateboarding. 

Check out Wired.com's new feature on Roman Mars and 99% Invisible, the tiny show about design that started at KALW, has since had more than 2 million downloads on iTunes, and is currently in the midst of a hugely successful Kickstarter fundraising campaign.

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