Responding to forced exclusion and incarceration with storytelling and art | KALW

Responding to forced exclusion and incarceration with storytelling and art

Jun 19, 2019

 


 

On this edition of Your Call, we’ll talk about cultural responses to exclusion.

Earlier this year Japanese American activists organized a pilgrimage to a former internment camp and an immigration detention center to protest the separation and indefinite detention of families. They brought with them thousands of paper cranes folded by people around the nation to express solidarity. As part of our series "HEAR: Histories of Exclusion and Resistance," we spoke with two women who participated, about the protest, and their own projects exploring the legacy of internment.

Guests:

Nancy Ukai, project director of 50ojbects.org, a website exploring the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans through objects belonging to camp survivors

Judy Shintani, artist focused on remembrance, connection, and storytelling to bring to light important topics like incarceration and exclusion, including through exhibitions and community events

Web Resources:

50 Objects, 50 Stories

Innocent Dreamers

PRI: Immigrant detention centers are a grim reminder of Japanese American history

ABC: Coalition of WWII Japanese American internment camp survivors stage peaceful protest at immigrant detention facility on Texas border