Nurturing the creative seed: The artwork of Josefa Vaughan | KALW

Nurturing the creative seed: The artwork of Josefa Vaughan

Apr 22, 2015

In 1983, after the U.S. Navy left San Francisco's Hunters Point Shipyard, a collective of artists moved into the abandoned buildings. Since then, the group has grown and grown until today, when more than 250 artists ply their trade in the former repair station. It is now America's largest artists' community.

Twice a year, they put on a free showcase for the general public, and the Spring Open Studios are happening this weekend. One of the artists on hand will be painter and print maker Josefa Vaughan. Besides being internationally known for her own work, she's the founder of the non-profit organization ArtSeed, whose mission is to help young and disadvantaged people reach their full artistic potential. And in that, she draws from her own personal experience.

KALW’s Ben Trefny sat down with Josefa Vaughan in our studios.

JOSEFA VAUGHN: Pictures show a glamorous Bayview Hunters Point that's still Bayview Hunters Point, with the families that were there still there, with the artists coming there and being involved and realizing a mutual need: that it's not about anybody coming in there to colonize or "help" anybody. Bayview Hunters Point has an enormous amount to teach people about public space, about communication and trust, and I would love to see it just ventilated more.

Click the audio player above to listen to the complete interview.

For more information about the Hunters Point Shipyard Artists Open Studios, click hereFor details about ArtSeed's Art-athon happening on Saturday in the Presidio, click here. And to see the work of William Scott, click here