City Visions: Salmon woes and crab toxin: is global warming to blame? | KALW

City Visions: Salmon woes and crab toxin: is global warming to blame?

Dec 8, 2015


December 14, 2015.  These are tough times for fishermen in California.  Unsafe toxin levels have postponed Dungeness crab season indefinitely, and state officials warn that the winter-run Chinook salmon is on the brink of extinction. Host Joseph Pace speaks with guests about these issues and explores whether global warming is to blame and what can be done to address them. 

Guests:

John McManus is executive director of the Golden Gate Salmon Association.  He comes from a varied background that includes ten years of commercial salmon fishing in southeast Alaska, 15 years producing news for CNN and more recently, 11 years doing publicity and organizing for the public interest environmental law firm Earthjustice.  Work at Earthjustice included organizing and publicity supporting restored salmon fisheries in the Columbia, Klamath and Sacramento River basins.  

Francisco Chavez is a biological oceanographer interested in how climate variability and change regulate ocean ecosystems on local and basin scales. He was born and raised in Peru, has a BS from Humboldt State and a PhD from Duke University. He is a founding member of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) where he has pioneered time series research and the development of new instruments and systems to make this type of research sustainable.  

William Cheung is an Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia and a Science Director of the Nereus Program and the Principle Investigator of the Nereus Research group since 2014. The Nereus Program is a global interdisciplinary initiative between the Nippon Foundation and the University of British Columbia that was created to further knowledge of how best to attain sustainability for our world’s oceans.