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National Red Wine Day-KALW Almanac-8/28/15

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  • 240th Day of 2015 125 Remaining
  • Autumn Begins in 26 Days
  • Sunrise:6:36
  • Sunset:7:44
  • 13 Hours 8 Minutes
  • Moon Rise:7:02am
  • Moon Set:5:19pm
  • Phase:99%
  • Full Moon August 29 @ 11:37am
  • Full Sturgeon Moon / Full Green Corn Moon
  • Full Grain Moon/Full Red Moon
  • The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.
  • Tides
  • High:10:58am/10:25am
  • Low:4:16am/4:19pm
  • Holidays
  • Red Wine Day
  • Dream Day Quest And Jubilee
  • Forgive Your Foe Day
  • National Bow Tie Day
  • National Cherry Turnovers (cheery)
  • Radio Commercial Day
  • Crackers Over The Keyboard Day
  • Race your Mouse Around The Icons Day
  • On This Day
  • 1774 --- Elizabeth Ann Seton is born in New York City. She went on to found the first Catholic school and the first female apostolic community in the United States. She was also the first American-born saint beatified by the Roman Catholic Church.
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  • 1798 --- The first American vineyard was planted in Lexington, Kentucky.
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  • 1833 --- Slavery was banned by the British Parliament throughout the British Empire.
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  • 1837 --- John Lea and William Perrins of Worcester, England started manufacturing Worcester Sauce (Worcestershire).
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  • 1898 --- At his pharmacy in New Bern, North Carolina, Caleb D. Bradham renamed his new soft drink "Pepsi-Cola." His customers had been calling it "Brad's Drink”.
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  • 1907 --- "American Messenger Company" was started by two teenagers, Jim Casey and Claude Ryan. The company's name was later changed to "United Parcel Service." 
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  • 1917 --- President Woodrow Wilson is picketed by woman suffragists in front of the White House, who demand that he support an amendment to the Constitution that would guarantee women the right to vote. Wilson had a history of lukewarm support for women’s suffrage, although he paid lip service to suffragists’ demands during political campaigns and greeted previously peaceful suffrage demonstrators at the White House with decorum. He was also a former teacher at a women’s college and the father of two daughters who considered themselves “suffragettes.” During the 1912 presidential campaign against Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson and his opponent agreed on many reform measures such as child-labor laws and pro-union legislation. They differed, however, on the subject of women’s suffrage, as Roosevelt was in favor of giving women the vote.
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  • 1930 --- "The Tom Thumb" was demonstrated in Baltimore, MD. It was the first passenger-carrying train of its kind to be built in America. 
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  • 1963 --- On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., the African American civil rights movement reaches its high-water mark when Martin Luther King, Jr., speaks to about 250,000 people attending the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The demonstrators–black and white, poor and rich–came together in the nation’s capital to demand voting rights and equal opportunity for African Americans and to appeal for an end to racial segregation and discrimination. The peaceful rally was the largest assembly for a redress of grievances that the capital had ever seen, and King was the last speaker. With the statue of Abraham Lincoln–the Great Emancipator–towering behind him, King used the rhetorical talents he had developed as a Baptist preacher to show how, as he put it, the “Negro is still not free.” He told of the struggle ahead, stressing the importance of continued action and nonviolent protest. Coming to the end of his prepared text (which, like other speakers that day, he had limited to seven minutes), he was overwhelmed by the moment and launched into an improvised sermon. The story that has been told since that day has Mahalia Jackson intervening at a critical junction when she decided King’s speech needed a course-correction. Recalling a theme she had heard him use in earlier speeches, Jackson said out loud to Martin Luther King, Jr., from behind the podium on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, “Tell them about the dream, Martin.” And at that moment, as can be seen in films of the speech, Dr. King leaves his prepared notes behind to improvise the entire next section of his speech—the historic section that famously begins “And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream….”
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  • 1968 --- At the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, tens of thousands of Vietnam War protesters battle police in the streets, while the Democratic Party falls apart over an internal disagreement concerning its stance on Vietnam. Over the course of 24 hours, the predominant American line of thought on the Cold War with the Soviet Union was shattered. Since the end of World War II, the U.S. perspective on the Soviet Union and Soviet-style communism was marked by truculent disapproval. Intent on stopping the spread of communism, the United States developed a policy by which it would intervene in the affairs of countries it deemed susceptible to communist influence. In the early 1960s, this policy led to U.S. involvement in the controversial Vietnam War, during which the United States attempted to keep South Vietnam from falling under the control of communist North Vietnam, at a cost of more than 2 million Vietnamese and nearly 58,000 American lives. The “Cold War consensus,” in U.S. government, however, fractured during the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968. Democratic delegates from across the country were split on the question of Vietnam. A faction led by Eugene McCarthy, a committed anti-war candidate, began to challenge the long-held assumption that the United States should remain in the war. As the debate intensified, fights broke out on the convention floor, and delegates and reporters were beaten and knocked to the ground. Eventually, the delegates on the side of the status quo, championed by then-Vice President Hubert Humphrey, won out, but the events of the convention had seriously weakened the party, which went on to lose the following election.
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  • 1972 --- David Bowie and the Spiders from Mars made their debut at Carnegie Hall in New York. 
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  • 1972 --- Mark Spitz captured the first of his seven gold medals at the Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany. He set a world record when he completed the 200-meter butterfly in 2 minutes and 7/10ths of a second. 
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  • 1977 --- Brazilian soccer superstar Pelé leads the New York Cosmos to victory in the Soccer Bowl, the championship of the North American Soccer League (NASL). With the help of international talent on its rosters, the NASL enjoyed surprising success in the mid-to-late 1970s in the United States, a country not particularly noted for its love for soccer. The 1977 Cosmos were a star-studded team that, at least for a short time, put soccer on nearly equal footing with the other major American sports.
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  • 1988 --- An air show involving military jets at the Ramstein Air Base in Germany turns tragic when three jets collide in mid-air and fall into the crowd. Sixty-nine of the 100,000 spectators died and hundreds more were injured. Toward the end of the NATO-sponsored show on August 28, Italy’s Frecce Tricolori team, flying Aermacchi MB 339 jets, began their routine. The team was led by Lieutenant Colonel Ivo Nutallari, who attempted a crossover move in which his plane passed very close to the other team jets. Nutallari miscalculated the daring move and his jet collided with the main group. Three of the jets exploded in mid-air, causing wreckage and jet fuel to rain down on the crowd.
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  • 2000 --- Foster's Brewing of Australia acquired Beringer Wine Estates of Napa, California for $1.5 billion.
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  • 2004 --- George Brunstad, at age 70, became the oldest person to swim the English Channel. The swim from Dover, England, to Sangatte, France, took 15 hours and 59 minutes.
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  • 2006 --- Warren Jeffs, the leader of a polygamist sect of Mormons, is arrested by a highway patrol officer during a traffic stop in Nevada. At the time of his arrest, Jeffs was facing charges in Arizona and Utah of arranging marriages between men and underage girls. The 50-year-old self-proclaimed prophet had been on the run from the law for more than a year and was on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list. 
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  • Birthdays
  • Charles Stewart Rolls
  • Elizabeth Ann Seton (first american born saint)
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • Nancy Culp
  • Donald O’Connor
  • David Soul
  • Emma Samms
  • Jason Priestly
  • Janet Evans
  • LeAnn Rimes