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National S'mores Day-KALW Almanac-August 10, 2015

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  • 222nd Day of 2015 143 Remaining
  • Autumn Begins in 44 Days
  • Sunrise:6:21
  • Sunset:8:08
  • 13 Hours 47 Minutes
  • Moon Rise:2:51am
  • Moon Set:5:19pm
  • Phase:14%
  • Full Moon August 29 @ 11:37am
  • Full Sturgeon Moon / Full Green Corn Moon
  • Full Grain Moon/Full Red Moon
  • The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.
  • Tides
  • High:9:34am/8:28pm
  • Low:2:48am/2:26pm
  • Holidays
  • National Lazy Day
  • National S’mores Day
  • National Spoil Your Dog Day
  • Smithsonian Day
  • Skyscaper Appreciation Day
  •  
  • International Biodiesel Day
  • World Lion Day
  • On This Day
  • 1776 --- News reaches London that the Americans had drafted the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration of Independence was largely the work of Virginian Thomas Jefferson. In justifying American independence, Jefferson drew generously from the political philosophy of John Locke, an advocate of natural rights, and from the work of other British theorists. The declaration features the immortal lines “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It then goes on to present a long list of grievances that provided the American rationale for rebellion.
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  • 1792 --- King Louis XVI was taken into custody by mobs during the French Revolution. He was executed the following January after being put on trial for treason. 
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  • 1793 --- After more than two centuries as a royal palace, the Louvre is opened as a public museum in Paris by the French revolutionary government. Today, the Louvre’s collection is one of the richest in the world, with artwork and artifacts representative of 11,000 years of human civilization and culture.  In the 1980s and 1990s, the Grand Louvre, as the museum is officially known, underwent major remodeling. Modern museum amenities were added and thousands of square meters of new exhibition space were opened. The Chinese American architect I.M. Pei built a steel-and-glass pyramid in the center of the Napoleon courtyard. Traditionalists called it an outrage. In 1993, on the 200th anniversary of the museum, a rebuilt wing formerly occupied by the French ministry of finance was opened to the public. It was the first time that the entire Louvre was devoted to museum purposes.
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  • 1821 --- Missouri enters the Union as the 24th state–and the first located entirely west of the Mississippi River. Named for one of the Native American groups that once lived in the territory, Missouri became a U.S. possession as part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. 
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  • 1846 --- The Smithsonian Institution was chartered by the U.S. Congress. The "Nation's Attic" was made possible by $500,000 given by scientist Joseph Smithson. Today, the Smithsonian is composed of 19 museums and galleries including the recently announced National Museum of African American History and Culture,nine research facilities throughout the United States and the world, and the national zoo. Besides the original Smithsonian Institution Building, popularly known as the “Castle,” visitors to Washington, D.C., tour the National Museum of Natural History, which houses the natural science collections, the National Zoological Park, and the National Portrait Gallery. The National Museum of American History houses the original Star-Spangled Banner and other artifacts of U.S. history. The National Air and Space Museum has the distinction of being the most visited museum in the world, exhibiting such marvels of aviation and space history as the Wright brothers’ plane and Freedom 7, the space capsule that took the first American into space. John Smithson, the Smithsonian Institution’s great benefactor, is interred in a tomb in the Smithsonian Building.
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  • 1885 --- America's first commercially operated electric streetcar began operation in Baltimore.
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  • 1927 --- Mount Rushmore was formally dedicated. The individual faces of the presidents were dedicated later.
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  • 1945 --- Just a day after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan submits its acquiescence to the Potsdam Conference terms of unconditional surrender, as President Harry S. Truman orders a halt to atomic bombing. Emperor Hirohito, having remained aloof from the daily decisions of prosecuting the war, rubber-stamping the decisions of his War Council, including the decision to bomb Pearl Harbor, finally felt compelled to do more. At the behest of two Cabinet members, the emperor summoned and presided over a special meeting of the Council and implored them to consider accepting the terms of the Potsdam Conference, which meant unconditional surrender. “It seems obvious that the nation is no longer able to wage war, and its ability to defend its own shores is doubtful.” The Council had been split over the surrender terms; half the members wanted assurances that the emperor would maintain his hereditary and traditional role in a postwar Japan before surrender could be considered. But in light of the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, Nagasaki on August 9, and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria, as well as the emperor’s own request that the Council “bear the unbearable,” it was agreed: Japan would surrender.
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  • 1948 --- On ABC, "Candid Camera" made its TV debut. The original title was "Candid Microphone." 
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  • 1949 --- President Harry S. Truman signs the National Security Bill, which establishes the Department of Defense. As the Cold War heated up, the Department of Defense became the cornerstone of America’s military effort to contain the expansion of communism.
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  • 1955 --- Declaring that South Vietnam is “the only legal state,” Ngo Dinh Diem, Premier of the State of Vietnam, announces that he will not enter into negotiations with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) on elections as long as the Communist government remains in power in Hanoi.
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  • 1962 --- Marvel Comics superhero Spider-Man made his debut in issue 15 of "Amazing Fantasy."
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  • 1972 --- Paul and Linda McCartney were arrested for drug possession after a concert in Gothenburg Sweden. Paul was fined $1,000 and Linda $200. 
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  • 1977 --- 24-year-old postal employee David Berkowitz is arrested and charged with being the “Son of Sam,” the serial killer who terrorized New York City for more than a year, killing six young people and wounding seven others with a .44-caliber revolver. Because Berkowitz generally targeted attractive young women with long brown hair, hundreds of young women had their hair cut short and dyed blond during the time he terrorized the city. Thousands more simply stayed home at night. After his arrest, Berkowitz claimed that demons and a black Labrador retriever owned by a neighbor named Sam had ordered him to commit the killings.
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  • 1981 --- Pete Rose of the Philadelphia Phillies gets the 3,631st hit of his baseball career, breaking Stan Musial’s record for most hits by a National Leaguer. The record-breaking hit came in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals, the team with whom Musial had spent his entire career, and the former hits king was on hand to congratulate Rose.
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  • 1993 --- Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as the second female Supreme Court justice.
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  • 1993 --- A rare collision of three ships in Tampa Bay, Florida, results in a spill of 336,000 gallons of fuel oil. Fortunately, a combination of favorable weather conditions and preparedness kept the damage to a minimum. It was about 6 a.m. when two fuel barges heading into Tampa Bay’s harbor and one phosphate freighter heading out collided. The collision caused a fire on the Maritrans barge Ocean 255, crippling the ship, which was carrying 8 million gallons of gas and diesel fuel. Although it took nearly 16 hours to put out, no one onboard was killed. However, more than 300,000 gallons of oil were dumped into Tampa Bay.
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  • 2008 --- American swimmer Michael Phelps won the first of a record eight gold medals at the Beijing Olympics by smashing his own world record in the 400-meter individual medley.
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  • Birthdays
  • Henri Nestle
  • Herbert Hoover (31st President)
  • Leo Fender
  • Jimmy Dean
  • Bobby Hatfield
  • Ronnie Spector
  • Rosanna Arquette
  • Julia Fordham
  • Eddie Fischer
  • Rhonda Fleming