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Monday June 3, 2013

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  • 154th Day of 2013 / 211 Remaining
  • 18 Days Until The First Day of Summer
  •  
  • Sunrise:5:48
  • Sunset:8:27
  • 14 Hours 39 Minutes of Daylight
  •  
  • Moon Rise:2:45am
  • Moon Set:4:07pm
  • Moon’s Phase:21 %
  •  
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 23 @ 4:33am
  • Full Strawberry Moon
  • Full Rose Moon

The Strawberry Moon was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

  • Tides
  • High:8:24am/8:10pm
  • Low:2:19am/1:39pm

  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:16.36
  • Last Year:15.64
  • Normal To Date:23.65
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80

  • Holidays
  • National Chocolate Macaroon Day
  • National Egg Day
  • Chimborazo Day (Mt Chimborazo is the point on Earth that’s closest to the Moon, thus also the farthest point from the Earth’s center. Located in the segment of the Andes that passes through Ecuador, Chimborazo is an inactive volcano standing 20,565 feet high. Mount Everest, the highest mountain on Earth above sea level, is nearly ten thousand feet higher than Chimborazo, which should logically make it the point on Earth that’s closest to the Moon, but Chimborazo literally gets an additional boost from its location, nearer to the equator)
  • Labor Day-Bahamas
  • Martyr’s Day-Uganda
  • Mabo Day-Australia

  • On This Day In …
  • 1784 --- The U.S. Congress formally created the United States Army to replace the disbanded Continental Army. On June 14, 1775, the Second Continental Congress had created the Continental Army for purposes of common defense and this event is considered to be the birth of the United States Army.

  • 1800 --- John Adams moved to Washington DC. He was the first President to live in what became the capital of the United States. It would be November before he would move into the People’s House, or the Executive Mansion, later known as the White House.

  • 1888 --- There was no joy in Mudville, as Casey at the Bat was first published in The San Francisco Examiner. The author was not given a byline in the paper, but he was given $5. Ernest Thayer wrote a series of comic ballads for the San Francisco paper. Casey at the Bat was the last, and the only one to live on through the years. William DeWolf Hopper, the well-known actor, first recited the poem at Wallach’s Theatre in New York City this same year. It is said that he had told the tale of Mudville some 10,000 plus times.

  • 1937 --- Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson of Baltimore, MD, the woman who was the cause of King Edward VIII’s abdication of the British throne, was married this day to the former King (The Duke of Windsor). This was the storybook romance; the king in love with the commoner gives up his throne to spend the rest of his life with the woman he loves. They lived happily ever after ... in France.

  • 1937 --- The Sporting News reports that catcher Josh Gibson of the Negro League’s Homestead Grays hit a ball two feet from the top of the façade of Yankee Stadium, 580 feet from home plate. If Negro League records were kept alongside those of the National and American Leagues, Gibson’s home run would eclipse Mickey Mantle’s record 565-foot home run hit off Chuck Stobbs in Washington’s Griffith Stadium on April 17, 1953 as the longest ever hit. This is not the only record Gibson might hold, and possibly not the only record for distance. Some credit him with crushing a fair ball out of Yankee Stadium in 1934, which if true would make him the only player ever to accomplish that feat.

  • 1956 --- Santa Cruz, California, a favorite early haunt of author Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters, was an established capital of the West Coast counterculture scene by the mid-1960s. Yet just 10 years earlier, the balance of power in this crunchy beach town 70 miles south of San Francisco tilted heavily toward the older side of the generation gap. In the early months of the rock-and-roll revolution, in fact, at a time when adult authorities around the country were struggling to come to terms with a booming population of teenagers with vastly different musical tastes and attitudes, Santa Cruz captured national attention for its response to the crisis. On June 3, 1956, city authorities announced a total ban on rock and roll at public gatherings, calling the music "Detrimental to both the health and morals of our youth and community." It was a dance party the previous evening that led to this reaction on the part of Santa Cruz authorities. Some 200 teenagers had packed the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium on a Saturday night to dance to the music of Chuck Higgins and his Orchestra, a Los Angeles group with a regional hit record called "Pachuko Hop." Santa Cruz police entered the auditorium just past midnight to check on the event, and what they found, according to Lieutenant Richard Overton, was a crowd "engaged in suggestive, stimulating and tantalizing motions induced by the provocative rhythms of an all-negro band." But what might sound like a pretty great dance party to some did not to Lt. Overton, who immediately shut the dance down and sent the disappointed teenagers home early

  • 1964 --- T.S. Eliot wrote to Groucho Marx: "The picture of you in the newspaper saying that, amongst other reasons, you have come to London to see me has greatly enhanced my credit line in the neighborhood, and particularly with the greengrocer across the street."

  • 1965 --- One hundred and 20 miles above the earth, Major Edward H. White II opens the hatch of the Gemini 4 and steps out of the capsule, becoming the first American astronaut to walk in space. Attached to the craft by a 25-foot tether and controlling his movements with a hand-held oxygen jet-propulsion gun, White remained outside the capsule for just over 20 minutes. As a space walker, White had been preceded by Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei A. Leonov, who on March 18, 1965, was the first man ever to walk in space. Implemented at the height of the space race, NASA's Gemini program was the least famous of the three U.S.-manned space programs conducted during the 1960s. However, as an extension of Project Mercury, which put the first American in space in 1961, Gemini laid the groundwork for the more dramatic Apollo lunar missions, which began in 1968. The Gemini space flights were the first to involve multiple crews, and the extended duration of the missions provided valuable information about the biological effects of longer-term space travel. When the Gemini program ended in 1966, U.S. astronauts had also perfected rendezvous and docking maneuvers with other orbiting vehicles, a skill that would be essential during the three-stage Apollo moon missions.

  • 1967 --- The Doors "Light My Fire" was released.

  • 1989 --- With protests for democratic reforms entering their seventh week, the Chinese government authorizes its soldiers and tanks to reclaim Beijing's Tiananmen Square at all costs. By nightfall on June 4, Chinese troops had forcibly cleared the square, killing hundreds and arresting thousands of demonstrators and suspected dissidents. On April 15, the death of Hu Yaobang, a former Communist Party head who supported democratic reforms, roused some 100,000 students to gather at Beijing's Tiananmen Square to commemorate the leader and voice their discontent with China's authoritative government. On April 22, an official memorial service for Hu Yaobang was held in Tiananmen's Great Hall of the People, and student representatives carried a petition to the steps of the Great Hall, demanding to meet with Premier Li Peng. The Chinese government refused the meeting, leading to a general boycott of Chinese universities across the country and widespread calls for democratic reforms. Ignoring government warnings of suppression of any mass demonstration, students from more than 40 universities began a march to Tiananmen on April 27. The students were joined by workers, intellectuals, and civil servants, and by mid-May more than a million people filled the square, the site of Mao Zedong's proclamation of the People's Republic of China in 1949. On May 20, the government formally declared martial law in Beijing, and troops and tanks were called in to disperse the dissidents. However, large numbers of students and citizens blocked the army's advance, and by May 23 government forces had pulled back to the outskirts of Beijing. On June 3, with negotiations to end the protests stalled and calls for democratic reforms escalating, the troops received orders from the Chinese government to seize control of Tiananmen Square and the streets of Beijing. Hundreds were killed and thousands arrested.

  • 1990 --- President George Bush and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev end their three-day summit meeting with warm words of friendship but without any concrete agreement concerning German reunification.

  • 1991 --- Willie Nelson released his "Who'll Buy My Memories - The IRS Tapes" LP. The album was made up of songs that had been seized by the U.S. government and would go towards paying off his $16 million tax bill.

  • 2001 -- Mel Brooks' musical comedy "The Producers" won a record 12 Tony Awards.

  • 2003 --- Sammy Sosa (Chicago Cubs) broke a bat when he grounded out against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. The bat he was using had been “corked”.

  • Birthdays
  • Josephine Baker
  • Colleen Dewhurst
  • Allen Ginsberg
  • Rafael Nadal
  • Anderson Cooper
  • Chuck Barris
  • Ian Hunter
  • Suzi Quatro
  • Mike Gordon(Phish)
  • Jefferson Davis
  • Ransom Eli Olds
  • Maurice Evans
  • Leo Gorcey
  • Tony Curtis
  • Curtis Mayfield
  • Ian Hunter
  • John Paul Jones(Led Zeppelin)
  • Billy Powell