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Tuesday October 9, 2012

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  • 283rd Day of 2012 / 83 Remaining
  • 73 Days Until The First Day of Winter
  • Sunrise:7:13
  • Sunset:6:40
  • 11 Hours 27 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:1:02am
  • Moon Set:3:05pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 35 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • October 29 @ 12:50 pm
  • Full Hunter’s Moon
  • Full Harvest Moon

This full Moon is often referred to as the Full Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon, or Sanguine Moon. Many moons ago, Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. The leaves are falling from trees, the deer are fattened, and it’s time to begin storing up meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally reaped in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that come out to glean from the fallen grains. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, the Hunter’s Moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes.

  • Tides
  • High: 7:34am/6:16pm
  • Low: 12:20am/1:00pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:0.03
  • Last Year:0.11
  • Normal To Date:0.20
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • Moldy Cheese Day
  • Grinder, Hoagie, Hero Day
  • International African Diaspora Day
  • UN World Post Day
  • Alphabet Day-Korea
  • Day of National Honor-Peru
  • Leif Erikson Day-Iceland
  • Independence Day -Uganda
  • On This Day In …
  • 1635 --- Religious dissident Roger Williams is banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony by the General Court of Massachusetts. Williams had spoken out against the right of civil authorities to punish religious dissension and to confiscate Indian land. After leaving Massachusetts, Williams, with the assistance of the Narragansett tribe, established a settlement at the junction of two rivers near Narragansett Bay, located in present-day Rhode Island. He declared the settlement open to all those seeking freedom of conscience and the removal of the church from civil matters, and many dissatisfied Puritans came. Taking the success of the venture as a sign from God, Williams named the community "Providence." Among those who found a haven in the religious and political refuge of the Rhode Island Colony were Anne Hutchinson--like Williams, she had been exiled from Massachusetts for religious reasons--some of the first Jews to settle in North America, and the Quakers. In Providence, Roger Williams also founded the first Baptist church in America and edited the first dictionary of Native-American languages.
  • 1776 --- A group of Spanish missionaries settled in what is now San Francisco.
  • 1855 --- Isaac Singer patented the sewing machine motor.
  • 1855 --- Another patent was awarded this day -- to one Joshua C. Stoddard, for the calliope. The Worcester, MA inventor originally sold the colorful and somewhat noisy instrument (it produces 135 decibels, compared to the 100 decibels of sound produced by a jet plane at takeoff) to churches, believe it or not! Sales, however, took off when Stoddard sold the instrument to circuses and steamboat operators (not a bad idea since the calliope is powered by steam).
  • 1858 --- Mail service via stagecoach between San Francisco, CA, and St. Louis, MO, began.
  • 1872 --- The first mail order catalog was delivered. It was only one page but it worked. No, it wasn’t the Victoria’s Secret catalog ... nor Land’s End, J. Crew or Lillian Vernon. It was sent out by Mr. Aaron Montgomery Ward of the famous Montgomery Ward catalog and department stores.
  • 1919 --- The Cincinnati Reds won the World Series. The win would be later tainted when 8 Chicago White Sox were charged with throwing the game. The incident became known as the "Black Sox" scandal.
  • 1930 --- Laura Ingalls became the first woman to fly across the United States as she completed a nine-stop journey from Roosevelt Field in New York to Glendale, Calif.
  • 1936 --- Hoover Dam begins sending electricity over transmission lines spanning 266 miles of mountains and deserts to run the lights, radios, and stoves of Los Angeles. Initially named Boulder Dam, work on the dam was begun under President Herbert Hoover's administration but completed as a public works project during the Roosevelt administration (which renamed it for Hoover). When it was finished in 1935, the towering concrete and steel plug was the tallest dam in the world and a powerful symbol of the new federal dedication to large-scale reclamation projects designed to water the arid West. In fact, the electricity generated deep in the bowels of Hoover Dam was only a secondary benefit. The central reason for the dam was the collection, preservation, and rational distribution of that most precious of all western commodities, water. Under the guidance of the Federal Reclamation Bureau, Hoover Dam became one part of a much larger multipurpose water development project that tamed the wild Colorado River for the use of the growing number of western farmers, ranchers, and city dwellers. Water that had once flowed freely to the ocean now was impounded in the 115-mile-long Lake Mead. Massive aqueducts channeled millions of gallons of Colorado River water to California where it continues to this day to flow from Los Angeles faucets and irrigate vast stretches of fertile cropland.
  • 1953 --- Anne Jeffreys played Marion Kirby, Robert Sterling was George Kirby and the lead character of Topper was played by Leo G. Carroll on CBS-TV. Topper was called the first of the ‘spirit’ shows of the day. Marion and George Kirby had died along with their dog Neil (a St. Bernard) in an avalanche while on a skiing vacation. The three characters returned to their home -- now occupied by Topper. The adventures of the Kirbys, their dog and Topper were quite chaotic and a lot of fun to watch. The story was loosely based on the writings of Thorne Smith.
  • 1967 --- Che Guevara, age 39, is killed by the Bolivian army. The U.S.-military-backed Bolivian forces captured Guevara on October 8 while battling his band of guerillas in Bolivia and assassinated him the following day. His hands were cut off as proof of death and his body was buried in an unmarked grave. In 1997, Guevara's remains were found and sent back to Cuba, where they were reburied in a ceremony attended by President Fidel Castro and thousands of Cubans. Ernesto Rafael Guevara de la Serna was born to a well-off family in Argentina in 1928. While studying medicine at the University of Buenos Aires, he took time off to travel around South America on a motorcycle; during this time, he witnessed the poverty and oppression of the lower classes. He received a medical degree in 1953 and continued his travels around Latin America, becoming involved with left-wing organizations. In the mid 1950s, Guevara met up with Fidel Castro and his group of exiled revolutionaries in Mexico. Guevara played a key role in Castro's seizure of power from Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista in 1959 and later served as Castro's right-hand man and minister of industry. Guevara strongly opposed U.S. domination in Latin America and advocated peasant-based revolutions to combat social injustice in Third World countries. Castro later described him as "an artist of revolutionary warfare." Guevara resigned—some say he was dismissed—from his Cuban government post in April 1965, possibly over differences with Castro about the nation’s economic and foreign policies. Guevara then disappeared from Cuba, traveled to Africa and eventually resurfaced in Bolivia, where he was killed. Following his death, Guevara achieved hero status among people around the world as a symbol of anti-imperialism and revolution. A 1960 photo taken by Alberto Korda of Guevara in a beret became iconic and has since appeared on countless posters and T-shirts. However, not everyone considers Guevara a hero: He is accused, among other things, of ordering the deaths of hundreds of people in Cuban prisons during the revolution.
  • 1967 --- Coming out of the NBC Tonight Show Orchestra to become musical director of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, Doc Severinsen replaced Skitch Henderson on this night. Doc became famous for an eccentric wardrobe, quick wit, great trumpet solos and fabulous charts. Tommy Newsome became Doc’s backup arranger for many of the tunes the band played. Later, Doc and the band would move to solo albums, group CDs and incredibly successful concert tours. Doc went on to play with various symphony orchestras and even became the owner of a custom trumpet company in the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • 1969 --- In the United States, the National Guard is called in as demonstrations continue in Chicago protesting the trial of the "Chicago Eight." The trial had begun on September 24 and involved charges against David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, Thomas Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Lee Weiner, John Froines, and Bobby Seale for conspiracy to cross state lines with intent to cause a riot. These charges stemmed from the violent antiwar demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.
  • 1974 --- Oskar Schindler died in Frankfurt, Germany. Schindler is credited with saving the lives of about 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust.
  • 1975 --- Andrei Sakharov was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Soviet scientist is known as the "father of the hydrogen bomb."
  • 1980 --- John Lennon released "Starting Over" on his 40th birthday. It was his first record in five years.
  • 1986 --- U.S. District Judge Harry E. Claiborne became the fifth federal official to be removed from office through impeachment. The U.S. Senate convicted Claiborne of "high crimes and misdemeanors."
  • Birthdays
  • John Lennon
  • Sean Lennon
  • P.J. Harvey
  • Peter Tosh
  • John Entwistle
  • Jackson Browne
  • Sen Trent Lott
  • Nona Hendryx
  • Annika Sorenstam
  • Fyvush Finkel
  • Joe Pepitone