economy | KALW

economy

Liza Veale / KALW News

Many advocates say the Bay Area needs to build a lot more housing to solve its affordability crisis. Of course, that’s easier said than done, and the high cost of labor is often cited as one of the obstacles. But construction trades workers also need to live in this expensive area and they say wages, though higher than elsewhere, still barely cut it.

Amber Miles / KALW News

SF’s housing crisis is complicated. Yes, there’s a shortage of housing, but also a shortage of skilled workers. CityBuild has a mission; train local San Franciscans to fill those lucrative and much needed positions.

J. Stephen Conn via Flickr, used under CC BY-NC 2.0 / Resized and cropped

California is facing another showdown with the Trump administration. This time over offshore drilling. As part of a state-wide, multi-station project based here at KALW, we asked you to share your thoughts.

NOAA library

  

The US has imposed tariffs of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum. In response, a number of countries, including Mexico, Canada, and China, have imposed taxes on more than $24 billion of US exports. What do you want to know about the Trump administration’s trade war?


  On this edition of Your Call’s media roundtable, we’ll have a conversation with journalist Thomas Frank about his new book Rendezvous with Oblivion: Reports from a Sinking Society.


  On this edition of Your Call, we rebroadcast our conversation with former investment banker Nomi Prins about her new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

April 15th just passed and you hopefully finished paying the IRS. But, if you’re an independent contractor in San Francisco your taxes to the city are due next on May 31st.

  

On this edition of Your Call, former investment banker Nomi Prins discusses her new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World.

Jeremy Dalmas

This story originally aired in May of 2017.

San Francisco has the strongest economy of any city in the United States. And with business booming, a lot of eyes are on local corporations to see if they are giving back to the local community by paying their fair share in taxes.

Delaney Inamine

  

What has happened to our civic life? That’s the question economist Robert Reich asks in his new book, The Common Good. On this edition of Your Call, we’ll speak Reich about what this means and where to go from here.

 

Jeremy Dalmas / KALW News

 

The city of Oakland is in the middle of the putting together a document that will decide the future of its downtown.


On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of Puerto Rico and the role of private contractors on the island. Five months after Hurricane Irma, why are 400,000 people still without electricity?

Courtesy davidcayjohnston.com

In his new book, It’s Even Worse Than you Think: What the Trump Administration is Doing to America, investigative journalist David Cay Johnston says political termites have infested our government. On this edition of Your Call, we discuss how the Trump administration is working to undermine government.

Audrey Dilling

 

This story originally aired in January of 2016. The next affordable housing lottery in San Francisco will take place on January 18, 2018. It’s for 28 units in the Alice Griffith Apartments. There's an information session for Wednesday, December 13. For more information, click here.

 

Your Call: Can nonprofits survive the real estate crisis?

Jun 29, 2017
photo by flickr user Eric Richardson

  

In an increasingly tough real estate market, how can vital community based organizations survive?

 

Your Call: Reflections on the presidential debate

Oct 10, 2016

On the October 10th edition of Your Call, we'll break down the second Presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

On the December 24th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with economist Richard Wolff about rising inequality. The top 20% of US households own more than 84% of the wealth.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

 

Alyssa Arian has worked in San Francisco restaurants for a decade and, like most servers, she got into it for the tips.

“Some nights you leave with $80 or $90,” she says. “$100 is kind of the average mark for what you want as a server, sort of anywhere in this city I think as a minimum.”

Since February, though, Arian hasn’t earned any tips. She’s working at Sous Beurre Kitchen, a new French spot in the Mission where tipping’s not allowed.

Your Call: Yemen and the State of the Union

Jan 22, 2015
Hani Mohammed / AP

On the next Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of President Obama’s State of the Union speech. He focused on a number of economic issues including tax reform, jobs and education. How does the media’s obsession with political partisanship shape coverage of domestic and foreign policy issues? Where are the facts about taxes and the economy? We will be joined by McClatchy’s Mark Seibel and investigative reporter David Cay Johnston. We will be also joined by Sana'a based independent journalist Ataif Al Wazir.

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Under CC license from Flickr user Taber Andrew Bain

It all started a couple of years ago, when a happy-go-lucky guy I swim with named Joe Omran showed up at Aquatic Park one day in a foul mood. Thirty years ago, he bought a small grocery and deli on the western edge of Nob Hill called Le Beau Market. Now he wanted to open a café nearby. Just a little one.

 

  

On the September 25th, 2014 edition of Your Call, Naomi Klein talks about her new book, “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate”.  Klein says our current economic system can’t cut greenhouse emissions fast enough to prevent permanent warming.  As world leaders converge for the UN Climate Summit, is there still time to make the shift to sustainability?  And what would sustainability mean for the way we live?  Naomi Klein – on the next Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.    

Guest:

Under CC license from Flickr user Mark Adkin

What happens to people in their 60s who can't afford to leave the workforce, but they can't find a job? One place unemployed seniors might turn for help finding a job is the Senior Community Service Employment Program. It provides job training to low income, unemployed people by finding them temporary work at nonprofits around the country. Roxanne Murray is a director working with the program for the Family Service Agency of San Francisco. 

Your Call: What can be done to fix inequality?

Sep 17, 2014

 

  

On the September 17th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with investigative journalist and Pulitzer Prize winner David Cay Johnston. From 2009 to 2011, the top 1 percent got 121 percent of income gains while everyone else saw their income fall. Inequality affects every aspect of our lives, from healthcare to social mobility, family structure, justice, and education. How does inequality hurt our economy as a whole? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Photograph: Mohammed Saber / EPA

On the Agust 1st edition of Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss media coverage of US corporate tax laws and offshore tax havens.  And we’ll talk about reporting the ongoing Israeli assault in Gaza.  As of Thursday morning, more than 1300 Palestinians have been killed, and the conflict has also cost the lives of 56 Israeli soldiers and 3 Israeli civilians. We will be joined by McClatchy’s Kevin Hall, Michael Hudson of The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, and Samer Badawi of +972 Magazine.

A day in the life of the underemployed

Mar 12, 2014
David Boyer & Audrey Dilling

After years working in low-paying-but-rewarding social service jobs, Delynn Parker went back to school to get her Masters in Psychology. She had high hopes for more opportunities and better compensation after she graduated. That is not how it worked out. She is now saddled with a huge student loan and has found it difficult to find full-time work in her chosen field. Parker shared a day in her life – from her morning commute to her early bed time – giving insight into being underemployed in the Bay Area.


  

Under CC license from Flickr user Steve Rhodes

Earlier this year, demonstrators staged a “camp-out” on the steps of Berkeley Post Office building, which dates to 1914. Residents don’t want to see it go, but it’s part of a much larger plan by the US Postal Service to sell some of its $85 billion real estate portfolio.

Investigative reporter Peter Byrne has written an e-book that explores the rationale behind the sales, taking on the behind-the-scenes issues that are forcing the Postal Service toward bankruptcy. The e-book is called “Going Postal: US Senator Diane Feinstein’s Husband Sells Post Offices to his Friends...Cheap.”

  On today's Your Call, we'll have a conversation about influential people and corporations in San Francisco. Today, the city is defined by its growing number of tech companies, but San Francisco is also home to major financial institutions and developers. How do they influence the political and cultural landscape of San Francisco? And who's making important decisions about issues like development and the economy? Join the conversation and call in with your questions on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

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