2018 Election Briefs | KALW

2018 Election Briefs

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Proposition 12 has to do with the caging of farm animals.

 

Back in 2008, Californians passed an initiative to ban the practice of confining farm animals in extremely small cages. The measure said that animals had to be kept in cages that were large enough for them to turn around in and to stretch their limbs or wings. But the measure didn’t specify exactly how big those cages had to be.

 

Creative Commons CCO. By Tobias Kleinlercher. Resized.

Alright, let’s say you are a paramedic and you work for an ambulance company. When you take a lunch break, are you still on-call? Can your company make you respond to an emergency?

 

That’s the question being considered in Proposition 11.

 

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This proposition would allow cities to expand their rent control ordinances by repealing the 1995 law known as Costa Hawkins.

 

Proposition 8: Dialysis Clinics

Sep 18, 2018
Hemodialysis Skills Lab. Creative Commons. Resized and cropped

The country’s two biggest dialysis companies collect about 3 billion dollars a year from California dialysis clinics. Dialysis is the medical process that basically does what your kidneys should be doing, cleaning out toxins in the blood.

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Proposition 6 is all about repealing the new gas tax, and making it harder to raise gas taxes in the future.

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Proposition 4 is the Children's Hospital Bonds Initiative. It would authorize $1.5 billion dollars in “general obligation” bonds to award grants to children's hospitals for construction and renovation.

 

A general obligation bond is a lower risk loan because the government can repay the bond with tax revenue.

Pixabay, CC0 Creative Commons

As a kid, you might have learned the phrase “spring forward, fall back,” in order to help you remember how daylight saving time works. Since 1918, most of the United States has, on and off, observed the practice of moving the time forward one hour between March and November every year. The idea is to have more light later in the day - so, sunrises and sunsets happen one hour later - darker mornings, lighter evenings. This year, Californians will vote on whether we should keep this practice year round, and make daylight saving time permanent.

Flickr, TaxRebate.org.uk

 

Proposition 5 would amend the controversial 1978 law known as Proposition 13, which freezes property tax rates as homes appreciate over time. The new proposition would allow homebuyers who are over 55 or severely disabled to transfer their tax assessments when they move homes — that means, instead of paying the higher tax rate that often comes with a new purchase, they’d keep paying taxes at the rate that was set when they purchased their last home. As long as the new home is of equal or less value.

 

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Proposition 3 is one of the handful of state bond measures we are voting on this November. This one has to do with water. And it may sound familiar .  In June, Californians passed Proposition 68.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel/Released

Proposition 2 deals with funding a housing program for people who have mental health issues. Back in 2004, Californians voted in favor of something called the Mental Health Services Act.

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Proposition 1 is the Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act. If passed, it would authorize the sale of $4 billion in bonds to finance a bunch of existing low-income housing programs, build new, state-owned housing and match local housing trust funds dollar-for-dollar as they pilot new programs. One-quarter of this $4 billion would help veterans purchase homes, mobile homes and farms.

"one-forty/three-sixty-five" by CC Flickr User Laura LaRose

 

The votes are in — or, most of them anyway, with some mailed-in ballots yet to be counted. And California voters have weighed in on state and local propositions as well as many elected offices.

Stan Shebs / Wikimedia Commons

 

Fifty years ago, Napa Valley winemakers and community members wanted to protect the valley from housing and commercial development.

They declared agriculture — which in Napa Valley basically means grapes — the “highest and best use” of the land.

This paved way for the growth of the wine industry that currently coats the valley floor, and the tens of billions in profit the valley churns out each year.

But now some winemakers and environmentalists feel Napa Valley has reached its limit.

 

Back in 2016, Santa Clara County Superior Court judge Aaron Persky sentenced Stanford swimmer Brock Turner to six months behind bars for raping an unconscious woman. The case sparked international outrage.  

Muss0 / Wikimedia Commons

 

San Jose’s Measure B, and the counter-amendment Measure C, would affect housing development and zoning.

Measure B would rezone the Evergreen Hills area in San Jose to allow for large housing development on what is now undeveloped hillside.

The zoning change wouldn’t just apply to this site, but many sites like it that are currently zoned non-residential.

SUPPORTERS:

Zepheus / Wikimedia Commons

Emeryville’s Measure C is a $50 million bond to fund affordable housing. It was put on the ballot by the Emeryville City Council by a unanimous vote.

It would tackle housing affordability in a number of ways: By building permanent supportive housing for people experiencing homelessness, buying existing housing and converting it to affordable housing, and providing first-time home loans to low and middle income households.

 

THE MONEY

 

University of the Fraser Valley / Wikimedia Commons

Correction: In a previous version of this post, we miswrote the average cost of infant care in California. The average cost of infant care and Preschool in California is about $1000 a month and $700 a month, not $1000 and $700 a year. We have removed the audio and will upload it again when it is correct. 

Alameda County’s Measure A is about childcare and early education. Research shows that key brain development takes place during the first five years of life.  

Keith Allison / Wikimedia Commons

 

If things go the way Bay Area sports fans hope, by the time voters head to the ballot box on June 5, the Warriors may be in the middle of the NBA finals at Oracle Arena in Oakland.

But if the Warriors make the finals next June, they’ll be playing in San Francisco, in their brand-new stadium in Mission Bay.

Proposition I wants to discourage moves like this one. If it passes, San Francisco would have a quote “official policy” discouraging owners of professional sports teams from relocating to the city.

San Francisco Unified School District

 

Proposition G is all about pay for San Francisco Unified School District educators. Recruiting and retaining teachers, instructional aides, school psychologists and others who work with students has been tough for the district. That’s because San Francisco is a very expensive place to live.

Prop G would boost educators’ pay through a $298 parcel tax on properties in San Francisco. It would kick in on July 1 and stay in place for two decades. Senior citizens would be exempt.

 

Proposition H is a San Francisco ballot measure that would speed up the process of arming the city’s police officers with stun guns.

San Francisco’s police officers are already on track to carry taser stun guns. Last November, the city’s police commission voted to arm police with tasers.

 

San Francisco’s Proposition F would ensure free legal representation to anyone in San Francisco facing eviction.

 

You know how when someone gets arrested, the police tell them they have a right to an attorney and if they can’t afford one, one will be provided for them? Well, that’s true all across the country, but only if that person is facing criminal changes.

If you’re in eviction court — which is civil, not criminal — there’s no free lawyer.

Drivera / Wikimedia Commons

 

San Francisco’s Proposition E proposes to ban the sale of flavored tobacco products throughout San Francisco.

 

The Board of Supervisors already voted for this ban last year. But tobacco companies didn’t like that decision. So they gathered enough signatures to put the decision in the hands of the voters instead.

 

Quintin Gellar / Pexels

San Francisco’s Proposition D is one of several on the ballot about taxes.

The proposed law would increase taxes on San Francisco’s commercial landlords by 1.7 percent in order to fund more housing and homelessness services.

Not all commercial landlords would see increased taxes — about 20 percent would be exempt, including organizations like non-profits, and entertainment spaces like theaters or sports arenas.  

But the rent increase for the remaining commercial landlords would generate an estimated $70 million.

CST.org

 

Proposition C is about childcare and early childhood education. Brain research shows that’s really important for kids up to five years old.

But San Francisco is a really expensive city. And lots of low and middle income families can’t afford early childcare.

 

So to help subsidize early childhood education, Proposition C would put a 3.5 percent tax on most commercial landlords — property owners who lease industrial space, office buildings and retail.

JaGa / Wikimedia Commons

 

San Francisco's Proposition B makes appointed commissioners give up their seats when they run for elected office.

The mayor and the Board of Supervisors appoint people to be commissioners, and there are dozens of commissions that oversee everything from the airport to juvenile probation to building inspections.

Fir0002/Flagstaffotos / Wikimedia Commons

 

San Francisco's Proposition A is about financing power in San Francisco.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission deals with the city’s water, the city’s sewage, and it also provides electrical power to all city departments — from the airport to fire stations to schools.

Frank Schulenburg / WikiMedia Commons

Regional Measure 3 would increase the tolls on all Bay Area bridges — except the Golden Gate.

Under this plan, the tolls at every bridge would go up by $3 over the next seven years. So if you’re used to paying $6 to cross the Bay Bridge during rush hour — surprise! Next year it would cost $7. And by 2025 — $9.

 

The California Constitution currently says that any ballot measure passed by voters will go into effect the day after election day, unless the proposition states otherwise.

Proposition 71 supporters say that’s not enough time.

For one thing, mail ballots can arrive up to three days after the election and still get counted.

So, if passed, Proposition 71 would impose a five-day waiting period after all votes have been fully and completely counted and the Secretary of State has certified the election.

 

California’s recent six-year drought was the worst the region had experienced in over 500 years.

Water restrictions imposed by the state during the drought led many residents to start collecting water themselves, with buckets in their showers, rain barrels in the yard, or more complicated rainwater storage contraptions.

Homeowners who installed rainwater capture systems to conserve water may have had to pay higher property taxes as a result. That’s because constructing these systems can count as a property improvement.

 

California’s Proposition 70 is about cap-and-trade money, so at its core, it’s a proposition about how the state is addressing climate change.

 

That’s because cap-and-trade is a program designed to curb the use of greenhouse gases. Certain companies need to get permits for the greenhouse gases they create.

 

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