Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

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19th-century baseball lives on in Bay Area parks

Aug 6, 2018
Kristi Coale / KALW News

 

Bay Area Vintage Baseball — a game devoted to playing by 19th-century rules, with uniforms and equipment from the same era — attracts players seeking a sport that looks beyond wins and losses.

Why are the Oakland A’s so good this year?

Aug 6, 2018
Erik Drost, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

The Oakland A’s last won the World Series almost 30 years ago. Since then, there hasn’t been that much to cheer about. They’re a low-budget ballclub in a deep-pocketed league. Every time a player starts to get good, he gets shipped out because they won’t be able to afford to keep him. It’s enough to make a fan not want to go to a game. 

A’s celebrate 50 years in the Town

Aug 6, 2018
Courtesy of the Oakland Museum of California

 

The Oakland A’s have won four World Series titles. The Oakland Museum of California examines one series in an exhibit that celebrates the semicentennial of the baseball franchise’s tenure in the Town.

 

What has happened in the Bay Area is the past decade? Crosscurrents host Hana Baba and news director Ben Trefny look back at the historic moments that have shaped our coverage and share clips from the award-winning journalism that came out of it.

The Stoop: African writers' dilemma

Aug 2, 2018
Courtesy of The Stoop

Who gets to choose which African stories get told? In this special episode from The Stoop, we meet three writers, each of them pushing against a mostly white US and UK-based publishing industry in their own way. 

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

The California Global Youth Peace Summit brings together immigrants, refugees, and US-born youth for a week of community-building and reflection.

Courtesy of the International Congress of Youth Voices

 

The International Congress of Youth Voices is taking place this weekend in San Francisco. It’s the brainchild of author and educator Dave Eggers along with Amanda Uhle, bringing together 100 students to talk with famous writers, activists, and elected officials. Youth delegates are coming from Honduras, Iceland, Iraq, Syria, Zambia and other countries around the world.

Bay Area Beats: ASTU

Jul 31, 2018
Lara Kaur

 

With the 2018 release of her debut album “Patterns”;  Eritrean-American singer and songwriter ASTU explores her experiences of love, redemption and black womanhood. The songstress’ path has taken her from being a former minister in Oklahoma all the way to finding a new sense of self and belonging in the city of Oakland.

Flickr user KitAy, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

Studies have shown that proper nutrition can help improve health outcomes and lower healthcare costs. However, starting healthy eating habits can be challenging for any new family, and for low-income families in the East Oakland flatlands, which has long been considered a food desert, that challenge is even harder to overcome. Through our crowd-sourced journalism project, Hey Area, one listener asked, "Where is the best place in East Oakland to buy fresh produce with WIC vouchers?"

A revolutionary poet fans the Bay's literary fires

Jul 30, 2018

From prison activism to revolutionary poetry, author and educator Tongo Eisen-Marten's work has taken him from San Francisco to South Africa, with a stop at Riker's Island and Columbia University along the way.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

Rosa Hernandez left Oaxaca when she was 20 to work in the fields in Madera, California. Now, she co-owns a restaurant, Colectivo Sabor a Mi Tierra, where she cooks the food of her homeland for the many indigenous Mexicans who live in the area. She did it, she says, after realizing the cultural value of her food through inter-ethnic friendships and connections.

Hana Baba / KALW News

 

Earlier this month, the East African countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace deal, after decades of severed relations. The two nations fought a war in the 1990s after which all connection was cut off. No diplomatic ties, no trade, no transport — not even phone lines — despite a shared heritage and decades of intermarriage and close cultural ties.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

Bethany Snyder and Kristian Maul want their six-year-old daughter to know the importance of family because theirs is a little different: Kristian is trans. They sat down at the StoryCorps booth in San Francisco to tell their story.

The corpse flower blooms again

Jul 25, 2018
Zoe Ferrigno


San Francisco’s Conservatory of Flowers is usually closed on Mondays, but on July 23rd, the conservatory opened its doors to a stream of visitors, eager to see — and smell — a rare botanical phenomenon: the blooming of an amorphophallus titanum, or corpse flower.

Bo Walsh

Gabriel Ramirez and his team of coaches at Pro Wrestling Revolution in San Jose teach the artform and traditions of professional wrestling to a new generation of hopefuls chasing their dreams in the squared circle.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

Trinity County isn't in the news much, unless it’s wildfire season. It’s beautiful, remote, and rural. It’s also one of the state’s most food insecure places, where many people don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The county’s food bank director delivers food to the region’s most isolated — and hungry — residents.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

The West Side of San Bernardino is one of those neighborhoods where people still live in the houses their Mexican-American great-grandparents bought in the 1930s. Today, on the once-thriving commercial strip, there are plenty of vacant lots and storefronts, but one business is still a magnet for customers: the Mitla Cafe. It’s proof that sometimes a restaurant is more than just a restaurant. Since the ‘30s, the restaurant has born witness to and played a role in political change. It also happens to be an unlikely inspiration for how mainstream America sees — and eats — Mexican food.

Honoring Jerry Garcia's little-known past with Jerry Day

Jul 24, 2018
Used by permission from CC Flickr account humboldthead

 

You might expect that a Jerry Garcia-themed event in San Francisco would be founded by a Deadhead. You know, a stereotypical Grateful Dead mega-fan who followed the band around the country for years, dropping acid, wearing tie-dye, and talking about world peace.

J. Stephen Conn via Flickr, used under CC BY-NC 2.0 / Resized and cropped

California is facing another showdown with the Trump administration. This time over offshore drilling. As part of a state-wide, multi-station project based here at KALW, we asked you to share your thoughts.

Bo Walsh


If you’ve ever attended a professional sporting event, there’s a good chance at some point you have found yourself rising to your feet with hands raised in rhythm with thousands of other fans. It’s a phenomenon known simply as “the Wave. ”

courtesy of StoryCorps

Jessica Stillman and Amanda Abud are counselors at the Verity crisis center in Santa Rosa. The Tubbs wildfire, the most destructive the state has seen, incinerated almost 37,000 acres in Northern California. In this interview, Jessica and Amanda talk about how hard it was to leave Santa Rosa during the fires instead of staying to help counsel at shelters.

Lisa Morehouse / KALW News

 

Right now, there are backpackers crossing into Canada after five months of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. They're called thru-hikers, and they started the trail in Mexico and will traverse 2,650 miles. Now, the lazy among us might have just read "Wild," Cheryl Strayed's memoir about the Pacific Crest Trail. The even lazier among us may be waiting for the movie to come out in December. The hikers who actually make this trek see toenails fall off and their feet can swell whole shoe sizes. They say the only thing they talk about more than their feet is food.

kgroovy / Flikr Creative Commons

 

The Shipyard is supposed to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake. It’s slated to have affordable housing, office and retail space, and parks. But this year, the shipyard development has been infamously dubbed “The biggest case of eco fraud in US history.”

Hana Baba

 

The Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban preventing nationals from 5 majority-Muslim countries, plus North Korea and Venezuela, from entering the US. The administration put the policy in place to "protect US citizens from terrorist attacks and other public-safety threats," but many are referring to it simply as a “Muslim ban.” Amal Alaoudi shares how the ban has affected life for her and her family.

quinn norton from Excellent Question, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

When the travel ban was first announced, many people were outraged — nationally and here in the Bay Area. At SFO, people brought signs and stood in the arrivals hall chanting to make their point against the ban. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the ban, it’s become harder for activists, human rights lawyers, and community organizers to help those affected by it.

Bay Area Beats: DJ QBERT

Jul 19, 2018
Bo Walsh

 

Richard Quitevis is better known as DJ QBERT. He's been a pioneer in the art of DJ turntablism for close to 30 years.

Courtesy of Josiah Luís Alderete

Josiah Luís Alderete will tell you he is “a full-blooded Pocho Indio who refries his beans and poesia in Spanglish.”

Finding a personal relationship with God in jail

Jul 18, 2018
Courtesy of Oscar

 

Our ongoing series The Spiritual Edge occasionally spotlights stories about how people have found their own personal religious beliefs. Today’s story profiles an Uber driver named Oscar from Napa. He didn’t grow up particularly religious, but during a months-long incarceration, he found the Bible that would change his life.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

 

In the past few weeks, the Bay Area has had one protest after another over the country’s immigration policies. There were thousands of people who took to the streets to march in protest of family separation.

Order 9066: Objects of Incarceration

Jul 17, 2018
Courtesy of American Public Media

This is an excerpt from “Order 9066,” a podcast from American Public Media and the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

What’s happening today to immigrants seeking asylum or refuge in the United States has many thinking about another time, a time when another population was incarcerated in this country in the name of national security. The time was World War Two, and the people were Japanese Americans.

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