Hana Baba | KALW

Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

Hana Baba host of Crosscurrents, KALW's evening newsmagazine. 

She interviews and reports on communities of color, immigrant life, education, culture, religion, arts, and the local-global connections  of the San Francisco Bay Area.  She co-hosts the podcast The Stoop. Her radio work also appears on NPR programs, PRI's The World, and BBC World Service. A Sudanese-American, Hana loves reporting about African immigrant communities living in California.

Ways to Connect

When you hear the term ‘Black Muslims’ what may come to mind is the Nation of Islam, Malcolm X, or, if you’re from the Oakland, the controversial Your Black Muslim Bakery. Local filmmaker Nijla Mu’min wants to tell a different story.

Courtesy of Alia Sharrief

A young musician in Oakland is making waves in the Muslim community: Alia Sharrief. She’s part of a new generation of Muslim hip hop artists following in the footsteps of people like Yasiin Bey, best known by his stagename, MosDef, Lupe Fiasco, Qtip, Ali Shaheed Mohamed, the list goes on.

Public Domain

When people migrate to the US, they have to deal with lots and lots of paperwork, to be able to live and work in the country. When you’re here and you’re petitioning for your spouse or children to join you from another country, it’s even more paperwork. It can get confusing and overwhelming, especially if you don’t know English.

Tony Webster via wikimedia, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

Just over two weeks ago, 18-year-old Oakland resident Nia Wilson, a black woman, was stabbed and killed by a white man while on the MacArthur BART platform. News outlets reported the story, including KTVU Channel 2, the local Fox affiliate. But, in its broadcast, the network used a photo of Wilson holding up her phone case, which looks like a gun. That led to outrage and protest that using that photo was unethical and harmful. Shortly after, community members took their protest to the station.

Hana Baba / KALW News

 

Earlier this month, the East African countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace deal, after decades of severed relations. The two nations fought a war in the 1990s after which all connection was cut off. No diplomatic ties, no trade, no transport — not even phone lines — despite a shared heritage and decades of intermarriage and close cultural ties.

Hana Baba

 

The Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban preventing nationals from 5 majority-Muslim countries, plus North Korea and Venezuela, from entering the US. The administration put the policy in place to "protect US citizens from terrorist attacks and other public-safety threats," but many are referring to it simply as a “Muslim ban.” Amal Alaoudi shares how the ban has affected life for her and her family.

quinn norton from Excellent Question, used under CC BY 2.0 / Cropped

 

When the travel ban was first announced, many people were outraged — nationally and here in the Bay Area. At SFO, people brought signs and stood in the arrivals hall chanting to make their point against the ban. Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the ban, it’s become harder for activists, human rights lawyers, and community organizers to help those affected by it.

Gabrielle Lurie / San Francisco Chronicle

 

As the nation has been following for weeks now, thousands of migrant children coming to the United States are separated from their families at the Southern border.

The Uyghurs are a Muslim minority in Western China who have been marginalized for years there.

 

Their origins are interesting- Chinese, with Turkic and other central Asian influences. Their food is a fusion of Chinese, Arabic, Kazakh, Afghan and Turkish flavors and dishes. 

 

 

This story originally aired in May of 2015. 

Islam has a rich artistic heritage of architecture, design, music, painting, and poetry. Muslim poets like Rumi and Hafez are famous for a depth and beauty that defies time. Today, that poetic tradition is still strong. It's kept alive in what many may perhaps consider an unlikely place—urban America, through the genre of hip hop.

 

Hana Baba

This story originally aired in 2015. 

Through much of their history, Sunni and Shia Muslims have lived peacefully together in countries like Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq. But since the US invasion of Iraq in 2003, sectarian conflict has escalated in the region. Here in the Bay Area,  around 75% of Muslims identify as Sunni, just four percent identify as Shia.

The Stoop: Pretty for a dark-skinned girl

Jun 7, 2018
illustration by Neema Iyer

The Stoop podcast is hosted by KALW's Hana Baba and Leila Day. 

In this episode we explore colorism — discrimination based on skin tone, which has happened for decades in Black communities.

Hana Baba

For the first time in nearly a decade, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley is running against an opponent.

Courtesy of Pamela Price

Pamela Price is an African American civil rights attorney who says she wants to create change in Alameda County's criminal justice systems.

Handout / Center for Youth Wellness

When we experience trauma as children — whether it’s the stress of an abusive parent, divorce, substance abuse, or the effects of poverty — do these traumatic events affect our lives even when we grow up?

 

According to Pew Research, 75 percent of Americans have smartphones. Most of us are using them for GPS directions, and about 70 percent of Americans are on some kind of social media.  Roughly two thirds on Facebook.

Alexa Denton

 

A 2015 industry survey found that about 80 percent of those working in publishing are white.

 

Later this month, Starbucks plans to close down 8,000 of its stores to train its employees on implicit bias. This comes after a manager kicked two Black men out of a Starbucks in Philadelphia in April.

Asal Ehsanipour / KALW News

 

Last Wednesday, Grace Cathedral hosted an event that got national attention: a Beyoncé Mass.

When filling out the United States census, Egyptians, Moroccans, Iranians, and many other people from the Middle East and North Africa have always had to check the box 'White' or other. There’s no Middle Eastern or North African box. This is problematic because these communities rely on representation when it comes to things like legislative redistricting and health statistics—in addition to the cultural inaccuracy of calling them white in the American context. 

CC Flickr User Mike Linksvayer, resized and recropped

 

This is part of our series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the region.

 

Courtesy of Faisal Zedan

 

Oakland’s Faisal Zedan is a musician from a village in southern Syria. Growing up, his family loved music, and he grew to be obsessed with Arabic drums called darabukkas.

When we have conversations about war and refuge, we sometimes forget our children are listening. So how do you talk to kids about things like the war in Syria?

That’s what Union City children’s author Naheed Senzai tackled in her new novel for middle schoolers, Escape from Aleppo. The story follows 14-year old Nadia as she makes her way out of the devastation of war.

Courtesy of UC Berkeley Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

 

Scholars from around the country are at UC Berkeley this week for a conference exploring racial justice. It’s called "Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50."

Courtesy of Detroit Free Press

In the summer of 1967, more than 150 riots broke out in Black communities across the country, protesting racial injustice. President Johnson then called a special commission to investigate, which produced an unusual document, called the Kerner Report, which analyzed the reasons why Black communities were frustrated and rising up.

Courtesy of Snap Judgment

In 2017, there were 77 homicides in Oakland. Our friends at the podcast Snap Judgment reported on each one.

Sikh Coalition

 

Hate crimes against many communities have increased in recent years, and Indian Sikhs are no exception.

Courtesy of Alphabet Rockers

 

When we think of hip-hop shows, we may think of night clubs and big loud concert halls. But how bout 11 a.m. at the public library in the kids section?

Hana Baba

 

This weekend African entrepreneurs and innovators are converging in Mountain View to talk business.

The Stoop: Angry Black woman

Jan 22, 2018
ILLUSTRATION BY NEEMA IYER

For decades, Black women have been stereotyped as being "loud" and "dramatic" and often asked to quote "tone it down" — especially in the workplace.

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